Your Monday Briefing

It has been well said that a hungry man is more interested in four sandwiches than four freedoms.
Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.


By Azra Isakovic

Jan. 11, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Monday Briefing

Books

Books – The Habsburg Empire — Pieter M. Judson | Harvard University Press


Books/Review – How America Chose Supremacy, by William Anthony Hay | Law & Liberty
Books/Review – « Tomorrow, the World”, review by Paul Kennedy | The Wall Street Journal

Must-Reads

Russia – Russia’s Military in the 2020s  Pavel Luzin, Riddle
Missiles – Austin Must Overhaul Aging Missile Defense System  Michael Evans, Times
Nato – Time for NATO Members to Renew Their Vows  J. Foggo III & V. Zakem, Proceedings
China/Japan – China-Japan Fish Fight Could Turn Ugly  Neil Newman, SCMP

Global – The World After the Coronavirus – Foreign Policy, Various authors, Foreign Policy  
US – Profound Rebuilding Needed to Shore Up U.S. Democracy, Rachel Kleinfeld, Carnegie Endowment   
US –It Happened in America, Pippa Norris, Foreign Affairs
US – The Capitol Siege Is the Wake-up Call America Shouldn’t Have Needed, Larry Diamond, Foreign Affairs 
US/Democracy – America Can’t Promote Democracy Abroad. It Can’t Even Protect It at Home, Emma Ashford, Foreign Policy 
US/Sanctions – New Sanctions in the US Defence Budget, Bartosz Bieliszczuk, Mateusz Piotrowski, Polish Institute of International Relations PISM
US/Defense – Warfare’s worldwide web, The Economist 
US/Europe –Transatlantic relations: Putting it back together again, The Economist 
US/China/Energy –Why the United States should compete with China on global clean energy finance, Chuyu Liu and Johannes Urpelainen   
EU/NATO – Time for Big Picture Thinking, Barbara Kunz, Internationale Politik Quarterly
Germany/China – Riding High: Deutschland AG in China, The Economist 

Newsletter

Newsletter – Chartbook Newsletter #10  by Adam Tooze

Research & Analysis

Russia/Baltics – Russia’s Strategic Interests and Actions in the Baltic Region, Heinrich Brauß  and András Rácz, DGAP


US/China/Sanctions – Raising a Caution Flag on US Financial Sanctions against China, Jeffrey J. Schott, PIIE      
Arctic – Climate Change and the Opening of the Transpolar Sea Route: Logistics, Governance, and Wider Geo-economic, Societal and Environmental Impacts, Mia M. Bennett, Scott R. Stephenson, Kang Yang, Michael T. Bravo, and Bert De Jonghe, in Kristina Spohr and Daniel S. Hamilton, editors, Jason Moyer, associate editor

Weekly Roundup / Bilan hebdomadaire

Whenever you do a thing, act as if all the world were watching. Thomas Jefferson


Azra Isakovic

Good morning and welcome to our Weekly Roundup – Here’s what you need to know

Management Isabelle Ferreras et Johann Chapoutot, penseurs du management, | France Culture 🎧 Podcast🎙

Livres 📚 – Libres d’obéir ; le management, du nazisme à aujourd’hui, par Johann Chapoutot | Gallimard

Livres📚« Le Manifeste Travail. Démocratiser. Démarchandiser. Dépolluer » Sous la direction d’Isabelle Ferreras, Julie Battilana et Dominique Méda #ManifesteTravail | Editions du Seuil

Books 📚- Dreamworlds of Race: Empire and the Utopian Destiny of Anglo-America, by Duncan Bell Unis | Princeton University Press

Books/Review The old consensus antitrust is dead. Long live the new non-consensus by Niamh Dunne | Project Syndicate

Nato/ Energy – NATO’s Energy Security Rests on a Fragile Cease-Fire  Alex Vatanka, RCWorld

China/BRIChina Pulls Back From the World  James Kynge & Jonathan Wheatley, Financial Times

China – How China’s Communist Party Trains Foreign Politicians  Economist

US/Israel/MoroccoIsrael-Morocco Deal: Another Mess for U.S.  Bobby Ghosh, Bloomberg

#Covid19Pandemiebekämpfung: Der Impfstoff hätte früher nach Deutschland kommen müssen Thomas Schulz | Der SPIEGEL

China/France – France follows own road in cooperating with China By Dong Yifan |  Global Times

Votre briefing du mercredi – Your Wednesday briefing

A daily newspaper should report the news, not play at geopolitics. Rafael Correa


Azra Isakovic

Wed 9 Dec 2020

Good Morning

Voici ce que vous devez savoir – Here’s what you need to know.

Coronavirus/VaccineBlunders Eroded U.S. Confidence in Early Vaccine Front-Runner | The New York Time

The Biden TransitionBiden’s Choice For Pentagon Chief Further Erodes a Key U.S. Norm: Civilian Control | Glenn Greenwald

Covid19The Institutional Crisis and COVID-19, by George Friedman | Geopolitical Futures

Coronavirus/Vaccine  – Who gets it first? | International Politics and Society

EU/US/Digital – ‘Schrems II’: What Invalidating the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Means for Transatlantic Trade and Innovation, Nigel Cory, Daniel Castro, Ellysse Dick, ITIF

EU – Europe is right to risk a double ‘no deal’, Gideon Rachman, Financial Times 

US/Nuclear – Starting off on the right foot: Biden’s near-term arms control and strategic policy challenge, Frank A. Rose, Brookings 
US/Nuclear – Reviving Nuclear Arms Control Under Biden, Steven Pifer, American Ambassadors Review 

EU/UK – Britain is heading for a hard Brexit. Voters now prefer none at all, The Economist 

EU/Technology –EU vs Big Tech: Brussels’ bid to weaken the digital gatekeepers, Javier Espinoza, Financial Times 

US/Europe – A New Beginning with President Biden: Five German and European Priorities for the Transatlantic Agenda | SWP

Turkey/LibyaWhy Turkey Intervened in Libya by Jalel Harchaoui | Foreign Policy Research Institute 📥 PDF

Baltic Security: Managing Adversity Between Russia and Its Northern Neighbors YouTube

China Les nouveaux dazibao | Revue Esprit

US/China –The Trump State Department’s swan song? A strange, flawed China paper, Daniel Baer, Foreign Policy  

Europe/Defense –Europe Can Defend Itself, Barry R. Posen, Survival

 
US – The Reconstruction of America: Justice, Power, and the Civil War’s Unfinished Business, David W. Blight, Foreign Affairs

La laïcité – La laïcité, c’est quoi ? Retour au texte de 1905 avec Patrick Weil | France Culture

La laïcité, c’est quoi ? Retour au texte de 1905 avec Patrick Weil

 

Votre briefing du mardi

Authoritarian political ideologies have a vested interest in promoting fear, a sense of the imminence of takeover by aliens and real diseases are useful material. Susan Sontag


Azra Isakovic

Voici ce que vous devez savoir aujourd’hui:

#Europe🇪🇺/#Covid19 – COVID-19 Reveals Europe’s Strategic Loneliness by Éric André Martin | IAI PDF 📥

The Biden Transition – Biden Thinks He’s Tough on China. He’s Just Complacent By Bruno Maçães | Foreign Policy
China/Vaccine –  Scandal Dogs AstraZeneca’s Vaccine Partner in China | New York Times
The Biden Transition – Will Biden be the first sustainable trade president? | Hinrich Foundation
EU/Hungary/Poland – EU gives Hungary and Poland 24 hours to lift veto | EURACTIV

China/Central and Eastern Europe –  Central and Eastern Europe is no Chinese Trojan horse, Alicja Bachulska, East Asia Forum
US/Turkey – Problematic prospects for US-Turkish ties in the Biden era, Alan Makovsky, SWP
Arctic A New Strategic Gateway to the Arctic  Regin Winther Poulsen, Foreign Policy
Russia/China/Space – Sino-Russian cooperation in outer space: Taking off? Richard Weitz, The Jamestown Foundation  
France/EgyptMacron vows to keep defence ties to Egyptian regime | Financial Times
Digital/US – How Joe Biden Could Help Internet Companies Moderate Harmful Content, Sue Halpern, New Yorker 
Digital/EU – EU Hypocrisy on Digital Trade, Robert D. Atkinson, ITIF 
Digital/EU/US – Breaking the Transatlantic Data Trilemma, Tyson Barker, DGAP 
Digital/EU/US –  A transatlantic effort to take on Big Tech, Rana Foroohar, Financial Times 
China/Nuclear Will China Win the Nuclear Fusion Race?  Haley Zaremba, Oil Price
North KoreaA Bold Peace Offensive to Engage North Korea  Frank Aum & George Lopez, WOTR
OSCEIs the OSCE Still Relevant in Nagorno-Karabakh?  Bradley Reynolds, Riddle
EthiopiaThe Battle of Mekelle and Its Implications for Ethiopia  Judd Devermont, CSIS
Books“Jews, Liberalism, Antisemitism – A Global History” – Editors: Green, Abigail, Levis Sullam, Simon (Eds.) | Palgrave


Azra_Files : Your Thursday Briefing

« Liberalism defines government as tyrant father but demands it behave as nurturant mother. » Camille Paglia


Azra Isakovic


Good Morning

Here’s what you need to know:

China/Hong Kong/ Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow Are Sentenced to Prison Over Hong Kong Protest, by Austin Ramzy and Tiffany May | The New York Times

Coronavirus/ Why the U.K. Approved a Coronavirus Vaccine First, by Benjamin Mueller | The New York Times

Futurethink/ The Perils of Predicting With Futurethink  Brookings Institution

Class/Inequality/ The Gadfly of American Plutocracy | Boston Review

The Biden Transition/ Biden Wants America to Lead the World. It Shouldn’t By Peter Beinart | The New York Times

China/ How is China Managing its Greenhouse Gas Emissions? | CSIS

US/ American ‘Leadership’ Is an Outdated Concept  Peter Beinart, New York Times

US/Russia/ Russians Expect U.S. Relations to Worsen Under Biden  Russia Matters

Europe/ Reforming Dayton  Daniel Serwer, Foreign Service Journal

Russia/China/ Is Putin Really Considering a Military Alliance With China?  A. Gabuev, MT

EconomyTurning Hope Into Reality: OECD Economic Outlook, December 2020  

China/Digital / How should democracies confront China’s digital rise? Weighing the merits of a T-10 alliance, Steven Feldstein   Statecraft 

Russia/ Russia’s Lost War  Izabella Tavarovsky, Wilson Quarterly

China/Australia/ China Humiliating Australia as an Example to Others  Anne-Marie Brady, SMH

Defense/ The Next National Defense Strategy  Benjamin Jensen & Nathan Packard, War on the Rocks

US/ America First, Second, or What?  Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

The Biden Transition/ 4 Foreign Policy CrisesThat Will Hit Biden Early  Alex Ward, Vox

Australia/China/ No Winners in Australia-China Trade War  Shiro Armstrong, East Asia Forum

Asia/ What RCEP Says About Geopolitics in Asia  Rocky Intan, The Interpreter

Brexit/ Why This Is Real Brexit Crunch, Why It Isn’t  E. Casalicchio & B. Moens, Politico EU

EU/Asia/US/ EU must look to Asia, as well as rebuilding trust with US | Financial Times

China/Technology/ Chinese state-backed funds invest in US tech despite Washington | Financial Times

Biosécurité et politique par Giorgio Agamben

The_Triumph_of_Death_by_Pieter_Bruegel_the_Elder-2048x1461

Le triomphe de la mort, par Pieter Bruegel l’Ancien

Ce qui frappe dans les réactions aux dispositifs exceptionnels qui ont été mis en place dans notre pays (et pas seulement dans celui-ci), c’est l’incapacité de les observer au-delà du contexte immédiat dans lequel ils semblent fonctionner. Rares sont ceux qui tentent à la place, ainsi qu’une analyse politique sérieuse devrait le faire, de les interpréter comme les symptômes et les signes d’une expérience plus large, dans laquelle un nouveau paradigme de gouvernement des hommes et des choses est en jeu. Déjà dans un livre publié il y a sept ans, qui mérite aujourd’hui d’être relu attentivement (Tempêtes microbiennes, Gallimard 2013), Patrick Zylberman a décrit le processus par lequel la sécurité sanitaire, jusque-là restée en marge des calculs politiques, devenait un élément essentiel des stratégies politiques nationales et internationales. L’enjeu n’est rien de moins que la création d’une sorte de «terreur sanitaire» comme outil pour gouverner ce qui a été appelé le pire scénario, le pire scénario. C’est selon cette logique du pire que déjà en 2005 l’organisation mondiale de la santé avait annoncé « deux à 150 millions de morts de la grippe aviaire en route », suggérant une stratégie politique que les États n’étaient pas encore prêts à accepter à l’époque. Zylberman Patrick Zylbermanmontre que le dispositif proposé était divisé en trois points: 1) construction, sur la base d’un risque possible, d’un scénario fictif, dans lequel les données sont présentées de manière à favoriser les comportements qui permettent de gouverner une situation extrême; 2) adoption de la logique du pire comme régime de rationalité politique; 3) l’organisation intégrale du corps des citoyens afin de renforcer au maximum l’adhésion aux institutions gouvernementales, produisant une sorte de civisme superlatif dans lequel les obligations imposées sont présentées comme preuve d’altruisme et le citoyen n’a plus le droit à la santé (health safety), mais devient juridiquement obligé à la santé (biosecurity).

Ce que Zylberman a décrit en 2013 s’est maintenant produit à temps. Il est évident qu’au-delà de la situation d’urgence liée à un certain virus qui pourrait à l’avenir laisser la place à un autre, c’est la conception d’un paradigme de gouvernement dont l’efficacité dépasse de loin celle de toutes les formes de gouvernement que l’histoire politique de l’Occident a connu jusqu’à présent. Si déjà, dans le déclin progressif des idéologies et des croyances politiques, les raisons de sécurité avaient permis de faire accepter aux citoyens des limitations des libertés qu’ils n’étaient pas disposés à accepter auparavant, la biosécurité s’est démontrée capable de présenter l’absolue cessation de toute activité politique et de tout rapport social comme la forme maximale de participation civique. Ainsi a-t-on pu constater le paradoxe d’organisations de gauche, traditionnellement habituées à revendiquer des droits et à dénoncer des violations de la constitution, acceptant sans réserve des limitations des libertés décidées par des arrêtés ministériels dépourvus de toute légalité et que même le fascisme n’avait jamais rêvé de pouvoir imposer.

Si déjà, dans le déclin progressif des idéologies et des croyances politiques, les raisons de sécurité avaient permis de faire accepter aux citoyens des limitations des libertés qu’ils n’étaient pas disposés à accepter auparavant, la biosécurité s’est démontrée capable de présenter l’absolue cessation de toute activité politique et de tout rapport social comme la forme maximale de participation civique.

Il est évident – et les autorités gouvernementales elles-mêmes ne cessent de nous le rappeler – que la soi-disant « distanciation sociale » deviendra le modèle de la politique qui nous attend et qui (comme les représentants d’une soi-disant task force, dont les membres sont dans un conflit de intérêt pour la fonction qu’ils devraient exercer, ont-ils annoncé) profiteront de cette mise à distance pour remplacer partout les dispositifs technologiques numériques aux relations humaines dans leur physicalité, qui sont devenues de tels soupçons de contagion (contagion politique, bien sûr). Les cours universitaires, comme le MIUR [1] l’a déjà recommandé, seront en ligne de manière stable à partir de l’année prochaine, vous ne vous reconnaîtrez plus en regardant votre visage, ce qui Il doit être couvert par un masque de santé, mais à travers des appareils numériques qui reconnaîtront les données biologiques qui sont collectées obligatoirement et tout « rassemblement », qu’il soit fait pour des raisons politiques ou simplement d’amitié, continuera d’être interdit.

Après que la politique ait été remplacée par l’économie, maintenant même pour gouverner, elle devra être intégrée au nouveau paradigme de biosécurité, auquel tous les autres besoins devront être sacrifiés. Il est légitime de se demander si une telle société peut encore être définie comme humaine ou si la perte de relations sensibles, du visage, de l’amitié, de l’amour peut être réellement compensée par une sécurité sanitaire abstraite et vraisemblablement entièrement fictive.

Il s’agit d’une conception entière des destins de la société humaine dans une perspective qui à bien des égards semble avoir assumé l’idée apocalyptique d’une fin du monde des religions maintenant à leur coucher du soleil. Après que la politique ait été remplacée par l’économie, maintenant même pour gouverner, elle devra être intégrée au nouveau paradigme de biosécurité, auquel tous les autres besoins devront être sacrifiés. Il est légitime de se demander si une telle société peut encore être définie comme humaine ou si la perte de relations sensibles, du visage, de l’amitié, de l’amour peut être réellement compensée par une sécurité sanitaire abstraite et vraisemblablement entièrement fictive.

Source:  Biosicurezza e politica

[1] Ministère de l’Instruction, de l’Université et de la Recherche.

Réflexions sur la peste par Giorgio Agamben

virus-1-1-(1)

Les réflexions suivantes ne concernent pas l’épidémie, mais ce que nous pouvons comprendre des réactions qu’elle provoque chez l’homme. Il s’agit donc de réfléchir à la facilité avec laquelle une société entière a accepté de se sentir contaminée par la peste, de s’isoler chez elle et de suspendre ses conditions normales de vie, ses liens de travail, d’amitié, d’amour, et même ses convictions religieuses et politiques. Pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas eu, comme c’était néanmoins imaginable et comme cela se produit habituellement dans de tels cas, des protestations et des oppositions ? L’hypothèse que je voudrais suggérer est que, d’une certaine manière, et pourtant inconsciemment, la peste était déjà là, que de toute évidence les conditions de vie des gens étaient devenues telles qu’un signe soudain suffisait pour qu’elles apparaissent pour ce qu’elles étaient – que c’est, intolérable, tout comme une peste. Et c’est, en quelque sorte, la seule chose positive que nous puissions tirer de la situation actuelle: il est possible que, plus tard, les gens commencent à se demander si le mode de vie qu’ils avaient était bon.

Et ce à quoi il ne faut pas moins penser, c’est le besoin de religion que la situation révèle. Dans le discours martial des médias, la terminologie empruntée au vocabulaire eschatologique pour décrire le phénomène revient de manière obsessionnelle, surtout dans la presse américaine, au mot «apocalypse» et évoque souvent explicitement la fin du monde. C’est comme si le besoin religieux, que l’Église n’est plus en mesure de satisfaire, cherchait à tâtons un autre lieu et le trouvait dans ce qui est devenu la religion de notre temps: la science. Cela, comme toute religion, peut produire de la superstition et de la peur ou, au moins, être utilisé pour la propager. Jamais auparavant nous n’avons assisté au spectacle, typique des religions en temps de crise, d’opinions et de prescriptions différentes et contradictoires, allant de la position hérétique minoritaire (néanmoins représentée par des scientifiques prestigieux) de ceux qui nient la gravité du phénomène à l’orthodoxie dominante discours qui l’affirme et, cependant, diverge souvent radicalement sur la manière de le traiter. Et, comme toujours dans de tels cas, certains experts ou ces experts autoproclamés parviennent à obtenir la faveur du monarque qui, comme au temps des conflits religieux qui divisaient le christianisme, prend parti pour un courant ou un autre et impose ses mesures selon ses intérêts.

Une autre chose qui donne à réfléchir est l’effondrement évident de chaque conviction et croyance commune. On dirait que les hommes ne croient plus à rien – sauf à la simple existence biologique qui doit être sauvée à tout prix. Mais seule une tyrannie peut être fondée sur la peur de perdre la vie, seul le monstrueux Léviathan avec son épée tirée.

Une autre chose qui donne à réfléchir est l’effondrement évident de chaque conviction et croyance commune. On dirait que les hommes ne croient plus à rien – sauf à la simple existence biologique qui doit être sauvée à tout prix. Mais seule une tyrannie peut être fondée sur la peur de perdre la vie, seul le monstrueux Léviathan avec son épée tirée.

Pour cette raison – une fois que l’urgence, la peste, sera déclarée terminée, si elle le sera – je ne pense pas que, du moins pour ceux qui ont conservé un minimum de clarté, il sera possible de recommencer à vivre comme avant. Et c’est peut-être la chose la plus désespérée aujourd’hui – même si, comme cela a été dit, « ce n’est que pour ceux qui n’ont plus d’espoir que l’espoir a été donné ».

Source : Giorgio Agamben, Riflessioni sulla peste

Le coronavirus n’a pas suspendu la politique – il a révélé la nature du pouvoir, par David Runciman

Ben Jennings / The Guardian

Illustration: Ben Jennings / The Guardian

Dans un confinement, nous pouvons voir que l’essence de la politique est toujours ce que Hobbes a décrit : certaines personnes peuvent dire aux autres quoi faire

Nous entendons toujours dire que c’est une guerre. Est-ce que c’est vraiment ? Ce qui contribue à donner à la crise actuelle son aspect de guerre est l’absence apparente d’argument politique normal. Le Premier ministre passe à la télévision pour faire une sombre déclaration à la nation au sujet de la restriction de nos libertés et le chef de l’opposition n’offre que du soutien. Le Parlement, dans la mesure où il est en mesure de fonctionner, semble simplement passer en revue les motions. Les gens sont coincés à la maison et leurs combats sont limités à la sphère domestique. On parle d’un gouvernement d’unité nationale. La politique comme d’habitude a disparu.

Mais ce n’est pas la suspension de la politique. C’est le dépouillement d’une couche de la vie politique pour révéler quelque chose de plus brut en dessous. Dans une démocratie, nous avons tendance à considérer la politique comme un concours entre différents partis pour notre soutien. Nous nous concentrons sur qui et quoi de la vie politique : qui est après nos votes, ce qu’ils nous offrent, qui en profite. Nous considérons les élections comme le moyen de régler ces arguments. Mais les plus grandes questions dans toute démocratie concernent toujours le comment : comment les gouvernements exerceront ils les pouvoirs extraordinaires que nous leur accordons ? Et comment réagirons-nous quand ils le feront ?

Telles sont les questions qui ont toujours préoccupé les théoriciens politiques. Mais maintenant, ils ne sont plus aussi théoriques. Comme le montre la crise actuelle, le principal fait qui sous-tend l’existence politique est que certaines personnes peuvent dire aux autres quoi faire. Au cœur de toute politique moderne se trouve un compromis entre la liberté personnelle et le choix collectif. C’est le marché faustien identifié par le philosophe Thomas Hobbes au milieu du XVIIe siècle, alors que le pays était déchiré par une véritable guerre civile.

Comme Hobbes le savait, exercer un pouvoir politique, c’est avoir le pouvoir de vie et de mort sur les citoyens. La seule raison pour laquelle nous donnerions ce pouvoir à quiconque, c’est parce que nous pensons que c’est le prix à payer pour notre sécurité collective. Mais cela signifie également que nous confions les décisions de vie ou de mort à des personnes que nous ne pouvons pas contrôler en fin de compte.

Le principal risque est que les destinataires refusent de faire ce qu’on leur dit. À ce stade, il n’y a que deux choix. Soit les gens sont contraints d’obéir, en utilisant les pouvoirs coercitifs dont l’État dispose. Soit la politique s’effondre complètement, ce qui, selon Hobbes, était le résultat que nous devrions craindre le plus.

Dans une démocratie, nous avons le luxe d’attendre les prochaines élections pour punir les dirigeants politiques de leurs erreurs. Mais ce n’est guère une consolation lorsque des questions de survie de base sont en jeu. Quoi qu’il en soit, ce n’est pas vraiment une punition, relativement parlant. Ils pourraient perdre leur emploi, bien que peu de politiciens se retrouvent sans ressources. Nous pourrions perdre nos vies.

La brutalité de ces choix est généralement masquée par l’impératif démocratique de rechercher un consensus. Cela n’a pas disparu. Le gouvernement fait tout ce qu’il peut pour habiller ses décisions dans le langage des conseils de bon sens. Il dit qu’il fait toujours confiance aux individus pour faire preuve d’un bon jugement. Mais comme le montre l’expérience d’autres pays européens, à mesure que la crise s’approfondit, les réalités austères deviennent plus claires. Il suffit de regarder les images de maires italiens hurlant à leurs électeurs de rester chez eux. «Votez pour moi ou que l’autre lot entre» est une politique démocratique de routine. «Faites ceci ou autre» est une politique démocratique brute. À ce stade, cela ne semble pas si différent de la politique d’aucune autre sorte.

Cette crise a révélé d’autres vérités dures. Les gouvernements nationaux comptent vraiment, et il importe vraiment de savoir sous lequel vous vous trouvez. Bien que la pandémie soit un phénomène mondial et soit vécue de la même manière dans de nombreux endroits différents, l’impact de la maladie est fortement influencé par les décisions prises par les différents gouvernements. Des points de vue différents sur le moment d’agir et jusqu’où aller signifient encore que deux nations n’ont pas la même expérience. À la fin de tout cela, nous pouvons voir qui avait raison et ce qui n’allait pas. Mais pour l’instant, nous sommes à la merci de nos dirigeants nationaux. C’est quelque chose d’autre que Hobbes a mis en garde: il n’y a pas moyen d’éviter l’élément d’arbitraire au cœur de toute politique. C’est l’arbitraire du jugement politique individuel.

Sous un verrouillage, les démocraties révèlent ce qu’elles ont en commun avec d’autres régimes politiques: ici aussi, la politique est en définitive une question de pouvoir et d’ordre. Mais nous voyons également certaines des différences fondamentales. Ce n’est pas que les démocraties sont des lieux plus agréables, plus gentils et plus doux. Ils peuvent essayer de l’être, mais au final cela ne dure pas. Les démocraties ont cependant du mal à faire des choix vraiment difficiles. La préemption – la capacité de s’attaquer à un problème avant qu’il ne s’aggrave – n’a jamais été une force démocratique. Nous attendons de n’avoir pas le choix, puis nous nous adaptons. Cela signifie que les démocraties vont toujours commencer derrière la courbe d’une maladie comme celle-ci, bien que certaines réussissent mieux à rattraper leur retard que d’autres.

Les régimes autocratiques comme la Chine ont également du mal à faire face aux crises tant qu’ils ne le doivent pas – et, contrairement aux démocraties, ils peuvent supprimer les mauvaises nouvelles plus longtemps si cela leur convient. Mais lorsque l’action devient incontournable, ils peuvent aller plus loin. Le verrouillage chinois a réussi à contenir la maladie grâce à une préemption impitoyable. Les démocraties peuvent être tout aussi impitoyables – comme elles l’ont montré lors de la poursuite de toutes les guerres du XXe siècle.

Mais dans une guerre, l’ennemi est juste devant vous. Au cours de cette pandémie, la maladie ne révèle où elle est arrivée que dans la litanie quotidienne des infections et des décès. La politique démocratique devient une sorte de boxe fantôme: l’État ne sait pas quels corps sont vraiment dangereux.

Certaines démocraties sont parvenues à s’adapter plus rapidement: en Corée du Sud, la maladie est apprivoisée par un traçage extensif et une surveillance étendue des porteurs potentiels. Mais dans ce cas, le régime avait une expérience récente sur laquelle s’appuyer pour gérer l’épidémie de Mers de 2015, qui a également façonné la mémoire collective de ses citoyens. Israël peut également faire un meilleur travail que de nombreux pays européens – mais c’est une société déjà sur une base belliqueuse permanente. Il est plus facile de s’adapter lorsque vous vous êtes déjà adapté. C’est beaucoup plus difficile quand vous le faites au fur et à mesure.

Ces dernières années, il est parfois apparu que la politique mondiale n’était qu’un choix entre des formes rivales de technocratie. En Chine, c’est un gouvernement d’ingénieurs soutenu par un État à parti unique. À l’ouest, c’est la règle des économistes et des banquiers centraux, opérant dans les limites d’un système démocratique.

Ces dernières années, il est parfois apparu que la politique mondiale n’était qu’un choix entre des formes rivales de technocratie. En Chine, c’est un gouvernement d’ingénieurs soutenu par un État à parti unique. À l’ouest, c’est la règle des économistes et des banquiers centraux, opérant dans les limites d’un système démocratique. Cela donne l’impression que les vrais choix sont des jugements techniques sur la façon de gérer des systèmes économiques et sociaux vastes et complexes.

Mais au cours des dernières semaines, une autre réalité s’est imposée. Les jugements ultimes concernent la manière d’utiliser le pouvoir coercitif. Ce ne sont pas simplement des questions techniques. Un certain arbitraire est inévitable. Et la compétition dans l’exercice de ce pouvoir entre l’adaptabilité démocratique et l’impitoyabilité autocratique façonnera tous nos futurs. Nous sommes loin du monde effrayant et violent que Hobbes a cherché à échapper il y a près de 400 ans. Mais notre monde politique est toujours celui que Hobbes reconnaîtrait.

Source: Coronavirus has not suspended politics – it has revealed the nature of power