Your Thursday Briefing

A society without dreams is a society without a future.
Carl Gustav Jung


By Azra Isakovic

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Thursday Briefing

Featured

Green Energy – America’s race to net zero, Adam Tooze | New Statesman

Books

US/History – Ages of American Capitalism, Jon Levy | Penguin Random House
Review – Ages of American Capitalism | Eric Primm
À propos de : Karen Akoka, L’asile et l’exil. Une histoire de la distinction réfugiés/migrants, La Découverte, par Annalisa Lendaro | La Vie des idées

Must-Reads

India/Covid19 – ‘The system has collapsed’: India’s descent into Covid hell, Hannah Ellis-Petersen | The Guardian
Vaccine – How the Pandemic Changed Europe, Isaac Chotiner & Adam Tooze | The New Yorker
ECB – Hawks press ECB to scale back bond buying despite rising Covid wave Martin Arnold | Financial Times
Ukraine – Prepare for the Worst, András Rácz | DGAP
Ukraine/Russia – Russia, Ukraine and the West: Déjà vu all over again, Ian Bond | Encompass
Russia/Ukraine – Why Russia Is Escalating in Ukraine  Andreas Umland | National Interest
Interventionism – Is Liberal Interventionism Dead?  Sholto Byrnes | The National
Angela Merkel – The Merkel Model and Its Limits  Constanze Stelzenmüller | Foreign Affairs
US/Japan – The U.S.-Japan Summit: Uneventful and Indecisive  June Teufel Dreyer | FPRI
Germany – Germany’s corruption scandals: How to limit authoritarian influence in the EU, Gustav Gressel and Majda Ruge, | ECFR
Ukraine/Turkey – Ukraine-Turkey Cooperation Has Its Limits  Dimitar Bechev | Al Jazeera
Biden/Tax Havens – Biden’s War on Tax Havens Could Pinch Europe  David Böcking et al | Der Spiegel
US – How Joe Biden is reshaping America’s global role | The Economist
US/Digital – America’s Place in Cyberspace: The Biden Administration’s Cyber Strategy Takes Shape, David P. Fidler | CFR
Economy/Technology – The digital revolution is eating its young, Mark Esposito, Landry Signé, and Nicholas Davis | Brookings
Neoliberalism – Are Intellectual Property Rights Neoliberal? Yes and No, by Quinn Slobodian | ProMarket

Research & Analysis

Economy/Global – Global Goliaths: Multinational Corporations in the 21st Century Economy, C. Fritz Foley, James R. Hines Jr. and David Wessel | Brookings
Global Trade – East Asian Forum Quarterly: Reinventing global trade | Hinrich Foundation
Freedom – 2021 World Press Freedom Index | Reporters Without Borders
Europe/Climate – Europe’s green moment: How to meet the climate challenge, Susi Dennison, Rafael Loss and Jenny Söderström | ECFR
American Foreign Policy – Do External Threats Unite or Divide? Rachel Myrick | Cambridge Core

Podcasts

Ukraine – « Zelenskyy’s foreign policy: One year in » | Atlantic Council

Your Friday Briefing

« Only the vanquished remember history. »
Marshall McLuhan


By Azra Isakovic

Friday, April 16, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Friday Briefing

Featured

EU – Imagine that the coronavirus pandemic, rather than undermining confidence in the European Union, had strengthened it, Yanis Varoufakis | Project Syndicate


Books

Essay –Brexit and the Two Irelands by Ophélie Siméon | Books & Ideas
Essay –The Japanese Press: a Global Exception? by César Castellvi | Books & Ideas
9/11 –Reign of Terror , Spencer Ackerman | Penguin Random House

Must-Reads

Vaccines – Always Read the Methods Section | Zeynep Tufekci
Vaccines – What a J&J vaccine pause means Matthew Field | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
EU/China/Russia – The EU’s Worst Nightmare: a China-Russian Axis, David Hutt | Internationale Politik Quarterly
US/Japan – The Summit That Can’t Fail  Michael Hirsh | Foreign Policy
Germany – The Race to Define Germany’s Evolving Political Center Jeremy Cliffe | NS
India – India’s Trump Card Against China  Phillip Orchard, Geopolitical Futures
Russia/Ukraine – Why Russia Is Threatening Escalation  Gustav Gressel | ECFR
Russia/Ukraine – Russian pressure on Ukraine: military and political dimensions, Marek Menkiszak and Andrzej Wilk | OSW
Digital/EU/UK/USDo continued EU data flows to the United Kingdom offer hope for the United States? Kenneth Propp | Atlantic Council
Drones/Middle East –Droning On in the Middle East, Francis Fukuyama | American Purpose
Diplomacy – How Diplomacy Falls Flat  Sholto Byrnes | The National The National
Taiwan – Is War Over Taiwan Imminent?  Yun Sun | Korea Times
US/Japan – Can Japan, U.S. Lead way to 6G?  James Schoff & Joshua Levy | The Diplomat

Research & Analysis

Proxy Warfare – The Future of Sino-U.S. Proxy War  Dominic Tierney  | Texas National Security Review
Russia/Central and Eastern Europe/Western Balkans –Russia: mighty Slavic brother or hungry bear next-door? The image of Russia in Central & Eastern Europe and the Western Balkans, Daniel Milo | Globesec
China/Europe/Economy –  Home advantage: How China’s protected market threatens Europe’s economic power, Agatha Kratz and Janka Oertel | ECFR 
US/Health – The Time Is Now for U.S. Global Leadership on Covid-19 Vaccines, J. Stephen Morrison, Katherine E. Bliss and Anna McCaffrey | CSIS
NATO/Climate –A Climate Security Plan for Nato: Collective Defence for the 21st Century, Erin Sikorski and Sherri Goodman | Policy Exchange

Podcast

UK – Wales, England and the Future of the UK, Daniel Wincott | Talking Politics

Your Tuesday Briefing

Poetry is a political act because it involves telling the truth.
June Jordan


By Azra Isakovic

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Tuesday Briefing

Featured

Droits de l’homme –Pourquoi se souvenir de Srebrenica ? Florence Hartmann | Revue Esprit

Books

Russie – Un nouvel équilibre des pouvoirs: la Russie à la recherche d’un équilibre en matière de politique étrangère, Dmitri Trenin | Carnegie Russia
Review –Basic Urban Services in India: a Paradoxical Bricolage, by Hugo Ribadeau Dumas | Books & Ideas
Review – The Neglected Rights of the Disabled, by David Le Breton | Books & Ideas

Must-Reads

Europe/Asia-Pacific – Could Europe’s reemergence in Asia be a win-win this time? Richard Javad Heydarian, The National
US – Biden’s infrastructure plan replaces federal cynicism with a sweeping vision, Adie Tomer, Brookings
Ukraine – Conflict in Donbas: What Does Ukraine Stand to Gain? Sarah Lain, CEPA
Ukraine/Russia/US – On Ukraine’s doorstep, Russia boosts military and sends message of regional clout to Biden, Isabelle Khurshudyan, David L. Stern, Loveday Morris and John Hudson | The Washington Post
EU/Asia – Europe’s Re-Emergence in Asia: A Win-Win?  Richard Javad Heydarian | National
Germany – Söder Shakes Up German Succession  Guy Chazan | Financial Times
UK –
England Prepares to Get Drunk  Cristina Gallardo | Politico EU
US/China – Side That Heals Itself First Will Win US-China Cold War  Huang Jing | Nikkei
US/Health – What America’s Vaccination Campaign Proves to the World, Anne Applebaum | The Atlantic
Afrique – ONU et mercenaires russes en Centrafrique : le pacte du silence ? | Centre Afrique subsaharienne

Research & Analysis

US/Central and Eastern Europe – 100 Days of Biden’s New Transatlantic Strategy – Where Does Central and Eastern Europe Stand? Danielle Piatkiweicz | Europeum
EU/China/Technology – Technological Competition: Can the EU Compete with China? Francesca Ghiretti | IAI
Digital – Internet from Space: How New Satellite Connections Could Affect Global Internet Governance, Daniel Voelsen | SWP

Podcasts

China’s Maritime Militia – Trouble in the South China Sea Ankit Panda | The Diplomat

Turquie – L’Europe se montre-t-elle trop faible face à la Turquie d’Erdoğan? Ariane Bonzon, Christophe Carron, Jean-Marie Colombani, Alain Frachon | SlatefrPodcasts

Your Thursday Briefing

My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.
Dalai Lama


By Azra Isakovic

Thursday, April 6, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Thursday Briefing

Featured

Biden/Left How Joe Biden tamed the left, by Annie Linskey, Jeff Stein and Ashley Parker | The Washington Post

Books

Biden ‘Yesterday’s Man: The Case against Joe Biden’ by Branko Marcetic | Verso Books
Review – I need money, by Christian Lorentzen | London Review of Books
Nuclear Weapons – Restricted Data: The History of Nuclear Secrecy in the United States by Alex Wellerstein | Restricted Data

Must-Reads

Russia/Ukraine – Are Russia and Ukraine Sliding Into War? By Maxim Samorukov | Carnegie Russia
Russia/Ukraine – Is Putin About to Launch a New Offensive?  Peter Dickinson | Atlantic Council
Indo-Pacific – How Franco-Australian Cooperation Can Help Stabilize the Indo-Pacific, by Pierre Morcos | War on the Rocks
US – Here’s What’s In President Biden’s $2 Trillion Infrastructure Proposal | NPR
China/Iran – How Much Will China-Iran Deal Change Middle East?  R. Dergham | The National
Africa – Does ISIS-DRC Even Exist?  Robert Flummerfelt & Judith Verweijen | African Arguments
Europe/Health – Europe’s third wave: ‘It’s spreading fast and it’s spreading everywhere | Financial Times
Disruptive Technologies – Meet the future weapon of mass destruction, the drone swarm, Zachary Kallenborn | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
NATO – NATO’s focus on China is too narrow, Hans Binnendijk | Defense News
Nuclear Weapons – Why is the United Kingdom raising its nuclear stockpile limits? Matthew Harries | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Hungary/EU – To the Viktor Go the Spoils, Milan Nič and Julian Rappold | DGAP
Taiwan – A Taiwan Tripwire  Loren Thompson | Forbes
Indo-pacific – Charting a course through turbulent waters, by Cleo Paskal | Chatham House

Research & Analysis

US/Security – Interim National Security Strategic Guidance | The White House
EU/North Africa/Middle East – From Tectonic Shifts to Winds of Change in North Africa and the Middle East: Europe’s Role | IAI
Indo-Pacific – Indo-Pacific strategies, perceptions and partnerships – The view from seven countries, by Cleo Paskal | Chatham House

Podcast

Entretien – «Rivals in arms» de Alice Pannier, par Sylvie Noël | RFI

Your Friday Briefing

God cannot alter the past, though historians can.
Samuel Butler


By Azra Isakovic

Friday April 2, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Friday Briefing

Featured

Biosecurity – WHO’s “exciting adventure” to find the origins of COVID-19 runs into trouble, Thomas Gaulkin, Matthew Field | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Books

The BiographyPHILIP ROTH, Blake Bailey, by Cynthia Ozick | The New York Times
À propos de – “Liberalism, Diversity and Domination, Kant, Mill and the Government of Difference”, Inder S. Marwah | Cambridge University Press

Must-Reads

EU/China – Watching China in Europe – April 2021, Noah Barkin | German Marshall Fund
China – Is It Too Late to Challenge China’s Belt and Road?  Howard French | WP Review
Russia – An Opportunity for Russia’s Northern Sea Route?  Sergey Sukhankin | Jamestown
China – The New China Shock  Mark Leonard | Project Syndicate
Digital/Finance – Who Needs a Digital Dollar?  Barry Eichengreen | Japan Times
US/Russia/Arctics – U.S.-Russian Arctic Relations: A Change in Climate? Heather A. Conley and Colin Wall | CSIS
Suez – The Next Suez Threat? a Big Hack  Victoria Coates & Robert Greenway | Bloomberg
Russia – Russia’s Extraterritorial Military Deployments  Jeff Hawn | Newlines
Russia – Cyber Deterrence Matters  Erica Borghard | Russia Matters
Ukraine – Russian Troop Movements on Ukraine Border Test Biden Administration, Thomas Grove and Alan Cullison | Wall Street Journal
Europe/Populism – Orban plots new populist alliance for European parliament, Valerie Hopkins, James Shotter, Davide Ghiglione | FT

Research & Analysis

EU/Digital/Trade – EU Digital Policy and International Trade, Rachel F. Fefer | Congressional Research Service
Trade –2021 National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers | United States Trade Representative
EU/Digital – Europe’s Quest for Digital Sovereignty: GAIA-X as a Case Study, Simona Autolitano and Agnieszka Pawlowska | IAI


Podcasts

Europe – Scandinavie : des socio-démocrates nouvelle génération Florian Delorme | France Culture

La pauvreté de la science politique par Georgy Kunadze

 Ce rôle ‘civilisatrice’ de l’arsenal nucléaire est à nouveau en grande demande en Russie qui se relève graduellement, tout en retournant aux ‘valeurs traditionnelles européennes telles que la souveraineté, un État fort, l’éthique chrétienne et les normes morales’. Et l’Occident ayant perdu ces valeurs, et « vaincus, commence à agir … en violation de presque toute norme morale, juridique ou politique, que l’Occident lui-même a proclamé. »

En Russie, le domaine de la science politique est dans un état de crise. Cela est évident non seulement dans les œuvres des mystiques de la géopolitique et les charlatans de l’école ‘patriotique’, mais aussi dans les réflexions superficiels de leurs adversaires autoproclamés : les courtisans ‘libéraux’ respectables. Avec les premiers c’est clair depuis longtemps: ils sont fanatiques et scélérats ordinaires, simple comme les râteaux. C’est moins évident avec le dernier groupe. Ils sont instruits, ils maîtrisent couramment et ‘non-patriotiquement’ les langues étrangères ; ils sont chez eux en toute capitale occidentale. Ils comprennent tout à la perfection. C’est avec des représentants de cette ‘classe éduquée’ ou le problème réside. russie003Certains ont traversé ouvertement du côté de la réaction et révèlent avec enthousiasme de la folie. D’autres  déguisent avec diligence  ses vus autoritaires dignes de l’homme des cavernes dans ses propres formes académiques.

Je voudrais aborder la dernière contribution à l’apologétique du régime de Poutine dans l’article Le Concert de Vienne du XXIe siècle, écrit par le politologue bien connu, Sergei Karaganov.

De quelle manière l’anniversaire est  glorifié?

L’article commence par l’éloge de ‘jubilé glorieux’ – le 200e anniversaire de la défaite de Napoléon, formalisée lors du Congrès de Vienne en 1815. Un Concert des Nations a été formé au Congrès et qui avait fourni, selon Karaganov,  ‘de la paix presque absolue en Europe depuis plusieurs décennies et de l’ordre relativement pacifique pour près d’un siècle’. Cette déclaration est très controversée parce que le Congrès de Vienne a abouti à la redéfinition des frontières en Europe, ouvrant la voie à de nouvelles guerres, et parce que le but de notoire Concert des Nations était un retour à l’ordre européen qui existait avant la Grande Révolution française.bnf001

Cependant, encore plus intéressant est la raison pour laquelle l’auteur estime que le Concert des Nations a été bénéfique. Selon Karaganov, ‘l’ordre pacifique’ en Europe a été construit  ‘sans humilier la France vaincue’, et les grandes puissances qui ont créé cet ordre pacifique ont été relativement homogène et ont été «gérés par des monarques autoritaires… qui partageaient des valeurs communes … ». L’allusion pour le traitement prétendument humiliante de la Russie après sa défaite dans la guerre froide est tout à fait évidente. En outre, le rêve naïf de faire revivre un ordre par lequel  ‘les souverains homogènes, autoritaires’ font des deals eux-mêmes est tout à fait bien évident.

 

Comment nous avons arrêtés de nous inquiéter et comment nous adorons la bombe


Karaganov indique également que, malgré ce que notre ‘souverain autoritaire’, Staline, a convenu avec ‘leurs souverains’ à Yalta, en Février 1945, de la Seconde Guerre mondiale est née un monde divisé, plutôt qu’un ‘concert’ des nations homogènes. Il y aurait eu une nouvelle guerre, poursuit-il, si le Dieu n’avait pas envoyé à l’humanité un arsenal nucléaire, qui a sauvé et continue à sauver ceux qui l’ont, tout en refusant la protection divine à ceux qui ont choisi de ne pas en avoir. Yalta001Renoncer à son arsenal nucléaire n’a pas sauvé la Libye, déplore l’auteur, ‘correctement’ en ignorant l’autre exemple, beaucoup plus évidente et récente – l’Ukraine. La décision de l’Ukraine de renoncer à ses armes nucléaires ne l’a pas aidé de se protéger contre l’agression de la Russie. Mais la possession des armes nucléaires de la Russie l’a aidé grandement: Si la Russie voudrait saisir toute l’Ukraine, personne ne se serait battu contre elle. Selon Karaganov, c’est exactement ça qui équivaut ‘au rôle civilisateur des armes nucléaires’ dans un monde où certains gouvernements sont ‘plus égaux que d’autres’ comme on les pourrait décrire en termes d’Orwell.

La décision de l’Ukraine de renoncer à ses armes nucléaires ne l’a pas aidé de se protéger contre l’agression de la Russie. Mais la possession des armes nucléaires de la Russie l’a aidé grandement: Si la Russie voudrait saisir toute l’Ukraine, personne ne se serait battu contre elle. Selon Karaganov, c’est exactement ça qui équivaut ‘au rôle civilisateur des armes nucléaires’ dans un monde où certains gouvernements sont ‘plus égaux que d’autres’ comme on les pourrait décrire en termes d’Orwell.

Ce rôle ‘civilisatrice’ de l’arsenal nucléaire est à nouveau en grande demande en Russie qui se relève graduellement, tout en retournant aux ‘valeurs traditionnelles européennes telles que la souveraineté, un État fort, l’éthique chrétienne et les normes morales’. Et l’Occident ayant perdu ces valeurs, et « vaincus, commence à agir … en violation de presque toute norme morale, juridique ou politique, que l’Occident lui-même a proclamé. »

‘À en juger par la rage actuelle contre la demande croissante pour le respect des intérêts de la Russie’, poursuit l’auteur d’un air suffisant, ‘le pays aurait été achevé … si ses ingénieurs faméliques, ses scientifiques et ses militaires n’avaient pas sauvegardé, grâce à leurs efforts héroïques, le potentiel nucléaire du pays dans les années 1990’. L’imagination vivement peinte dans un tableau épique: patriotes héroïques qui cachent le patrimoine le plus important du pays – son arsenal nucléaire – des cohortes avides d’Eltsine qui rêvaient de s’en débarrasser tandis que l’Ouest-Traître n’a eu qu’attendre pour terminer avec la Russie. Karaganov croit-il vraiment dans tous ces contes de fées? Je me souviens qu’il a écrit différemment dans les années 1990. Peut-être que l’auteur souffre de l’amnésie? Bien sûr que non. Il se souvient parfaitement de tout. Il a décidé tout simplement de botter en touche afin de suivre la tendance à l’ordre du jour.

À présent, Karaganov prévient que le processus pour que la Russie ‘se lève de ses genoux’ ne sera pas facile. Il parle encore de cette « réaction hautement rigide et même douloureuse de l’Occident à la politique russe qui vise à arrêter l’attaque sur ses intérêts en tentant d’attirer l’Ukraine dans sa zone d’influence et de contrôle ». Vraiment, quoi de plus naturel que de prendre un morceau d’un pays voisin ou l’incitation à une rébellion séparatiste dans un autre de ses régions? Ceux-ci sont strictement des mesures défensives et préventives par rapport à un État souverain qui vu de Russie soit dans sa sphère d’intérêts ‘légitimes’. Et l’utilisation de l’Occident de ses sanctions comme son «arsenal nucléaire économique» à lui est vouée à l’échec: parce que maintenant c’est clair à tous combien c’est dangereux de se fonder sur les institutions occidentales, ces règles, ces systèmes de paiement et ses devises.

Autres géopolitique traditionnelles

Karaganov conclut avec le retour du monde à la ‘géopolitique traditionnelle’, mais avec la mise en garde que ce sera ‘une autre géopolitique’ (apparemment les mots ‘traditionnel’ et ‘autres’ sont utilisés de manière interchangeable dans sa version de russe). Dans cette «autre géopolitique» la puissance militaire – à laquelle la Russie a compté si lourdement dans le ‘Conflit en Ukraine’ – sera d’une importance réduite. Économie jouera le rôle décisif parce que le bien-être de la population est la plus grande demande des masses. Tandis que tout ne va pas bien avec l’économie en Russie la Chine se porte bien. Et avec le Chinois, nous additionnons 1,5 milliard de personnes (la Chine a un 1,25 milliard et nous avons 140 millions). Le bloc économique le plus puissant dans le monde se lève sur l’Asie continentale – la Grande Commonwealth eurasienne – qui émergera avec l’Organisation de coopération de Shanghai (OCS) comme son noyau. Naturellement, il n’y a pas d’alternative à cela.Putin_and_Hu_JintaoPeace_Mission_2007 Le nouveau bloc sera ouvert aux pays de l’UE, tandis que le futur rôle des États-Unis n’est pas clair. Tout d’abord, laissons inutile élite américaine de décider ce qu’elle veut. Laissons les États-Unis de suivre l’exemple de la Russie et de son ‘élite de l’esprit global, de sa diplomatie de première classe et des avantages de sa géographie’. Mais d’abord, les États-Unis devraient au moins lever les sanctions contre la Russie, en reconnaissant à la Russie le droit légal de faire avec l’Ukraine comme elle lui plaît.

L’esprit ne peut pas comprendre comment juger les compétences et l’intégrité d’un politologue qui compose, en 2015, un traité dans lequel l’absolutisme du XIXe siècle est salué comme l’avenir radieux de l’humanité tout entière. Mais nous sommes dans une ère de la Russie, pour citer les frères Strougatski, quand « On n’a pas besoin de gens intelligents. Nous avons besoin de gens loyaux. »

Eh bien, mais la réalité est encore pire

Au début des années 1990, l’URSS a subi la défaite dans la ‘Guerre Froide’, le menant à la faillite de son système économique, politique, idéologique et gouvernemental. La Russie est devenue le successeur de l’URSS, puis elle a semblée à beaucoup, d’être, un état proto-démocratique et libre, capable de devenir, dans le temps, un membre digne de la communauté démocratique occidental. Une telle Russie n’était pas du tout le perdant de la guerre froide. Elle a été le vainqueur, un pays capable de se libérer du cercle vicieux de son grand, mais tragique destin. Le monde civilisé avait admiré une telle Russie, il lui a souhaité le succès et l’a aidée, pas toujours comme nous l’aurions voulu certes. Une telle Russie avait une crédibilité sans précédent dans le monde. Et elle avait regardé son avenir avec un optimisme quelque peu naïf certes. Puis vint de nombreux échecs et les erreurs: il s’est avéré que les vieilles habitudes indignes ont la vie longue. Les certains nouvelles-là, ne sont pas mieux. Et puis le malheur, habillé en vêtements blancs de succès, est venu: les prix mondiaux des hydrocarbures ont fortement augmenté. Inattendue, en tous cas, non gagnée, la richesse a complètement corrompu notre gouvernement et notre conscience. 1020505073En conséquence, la Russie s’est voit elle-même comme une version allégée de l’URSS et a sérieusement entamée la restauration de vieux ‘ordre’ dans sa taïga, dans lequel elle a l’intention d’inclure toutes les anciennes républiques soviétiques. Une nouvelle ‘doctrine Brejnev’ est sorti des profondeurs de l’inconscient des autorités. Une nouvelle ‘Guerre Froide’ est devenu inévitable. Dans cette nouvelle ‘Guerre Froide’ la Russie ne peut ni atteindre la victoire, ni subir une défaite totale: Ce n’est pas en vain que le Dieu lui a envoyé l’arsenal nucléaire.

Traduction: A. Isakovic

Source