Your Wednesday Briefing

    « All men are prepared to accomplish the incredible if their ideals are threatened. »

Hermann Hesse


By Azra Isakovic

Jan. 20, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Wednesday Briefing

Books

Books – Bargaining over the Bomb: The Successes and Failures of Nuclear Negotiations, by William Spaniel, | Cambridge University Press
Livres – Le cri de Gaïa – Frédérique AÏT-TOUATI, Emanuele COCCIA | La Découverte Éditions
Livres – Les gardiens de la raison – Stéphane FOUCART, Stéphane HOREL, Sylvain LAURENS | La Découverte Éditions

Must-Reads

US – Francis Fukuyama still believes an « end of history », Michael Hirsh | Foreign Policy  
EU/US/ChinaHave you heard how the EU should have consulted with Washington before signing a deal with China? | Bruno Maçães
Digital – What the European DSA and DMA proposals mean for online platforms, Aline Blankertz and Julian Jaursch | Brookings  
EU/France/Digital – Brussels eclipsed as EU countries roll out their own tech rules, Laura Kayali and Mark Scott | Politico 
France – France issues charter for imams meant to fight ‘political Islam’, Pierre-Paul Bermingham | Politico 
EU/UK – A Brexit lesson: EU’s benefits, largely invisible, hurt to lose, John Lichfield, Politico  Global/Nationalism – The Nationalist International Is Playing the Long Game, Michael Thumann | Internationale Politik Quarterly   
US/Germany – Policing the police: Germany’s lessons for the U.S., Joseph P. Williams | U.S. News & World Report 
Germany – Merkel Minus Angela, Josef Joffe | Project Syndicate 
Germany – Laschet’s World, Henning Hoff | Internationale Politik Quarterly  
Germany/Europe – We’re not ready for Europe after Merkel, Mujtaba Rahman | Politico 
Germany/Health – Can We Stop a Super Coronavirus? Matthias Bartsch et al. | Der Spiegel  

Research & Analysis

Defense/Resilience – A Framework for Cross-Domain Strategies Against Hybrid Threats, Tim Sweijs, Samuel Zilincik, Frank Bekkers & Rick Meessen | Hague Centre for Strategic Studies 
US/Europe – The crisis of American power: How Europeans see Biden’s America, Ivan Krastev and Mark Leonard | ECFR PDF 📥
US/Europe/Iran –A new transatlantic consensus on Iran, Luigi Scazzieri | Centre for European Reform 
Health/EU/Finland – An abrupt awakening to the realities of a pandemic: Learning lessons from the onset of Covid-19 in the EU and Finland, Mika Aaltola, Johanna Ketola, Aada Peltonen, and Karoliina Vaakanainen | Finnish Institute of International Affairs  

Podcast 

Frédérique Aït-Touati : « Vous entrez dans le Théâtre du Soleil, et vous perdez toute notion du temps »

A propos du livre « Les gardiens de la raison, enquête sur la désinformation scientifique »

Your Wednesday Briefing

America’s present need is not heroics but healing; not nostrums but normalcy; not revolution but restoration. – Warren G. Harding


Azra Isakovic

Good Morning

Your Wednesday Briefing – What you should know for Wednesday, December 30

Books

Books – The Best of Books 2020 | Foreign Affairs

Books – How the Specter of Islam Fueled European Colonization in the Americas | Literary Hub

Books – What We Still Get Wrong About Alexander Hamilton, by Christian Parenti et Michael Busch | Boston Review

Must-Reads

Arab Monarchies – In Arab Monarchies, Absolute Rule May Be Dwindling by Hilal Khashan | Geopolitical Futures

China/EU – China-E.U. Talks Hit Another Snag as Biden Camp Objects | New York Times

2020 Saw the Return of the State Leviathan  Ferdinando Giugliano, Bloomberg

Turkey Sticks to Its Guns on S-400  Semih Idiz, Al Monitor

Viktor Orbán – The Broad Coalition Trying to Take Down Orban  Dalibor Rohac, The Bulwark

Will Italy-U.S. Relations Become Less Ambiguous?  Dario Cristiani, GMF

Hong Kong Reveals China’s Long-Term Strategy  Guy Sorman, City Journal

Where Year Two of the Pandemic Will Take Us  Ed Yong, The Atlantic

Global inequality –  Chateaubriand and inequality: two centuries later | Branko Milanovic

Far-Right – A Far-Right Terrorism Suspect With a Refugee Disguise: The Tale of Franco A. | New York Times

Research & Analysis

#Covid19/#Europe🇪🇺 – Le COVID-19 révèle la solitude stratégique de l’Europe, par Éric-André Martin | Ifri | IAI Papers PDF 📥  

Covid19/Europe🇪🇺/#US🇺🇸/#China🇨🇳 –  L’Europe face à la rivalité sino-américaine : le coronavirus comme catalyseur | IFRI PDF 📥 

Japon/Afrique – La diplomatie économique du Japon en Afrique, par Céline Pajon| Notes de l’Ifri décembre 2020 PDF 📥

Your Tuesday Briefing What you should know for Tuesday, December 29

The modern conservative is engaged in one of man’s oldest exercises in moral philosophy;
that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.

John Kenneth Galbraith


Azra Isakovic

Good Morning

Your Tuesday Briefing What you should know for Tuesday, December 29

Covid19 – The Threat of Authoritarianism in the U.S. is Very Real, and Has Nothing To Do With Trump | Glenn Greenwald

Covid19 –  Des reconfinements locaux envisagés après les fêtes |  Les Echos

Trump Weighed Naming Election Conspiracy Theorist as Special Counsel | New York Times

Books – The Habsburgs by Martyn Rady review – negative genetic feedback loop, by John Gallagher | The Guardian

Updating the Strategic Canon for a Sinocentric Era  John Sullivan, War on the Rocks

A Key to Johnson’s Triumph Over Europe  Paul Goodman, Conservative Home

The Vast Gulf Between Scotland and England  Iain Pope, The Scotsman

Old Man Trudeau and a Pack of Newbies  Shannon Proudfoot, Maclean’s

What Canada’s Conservative Leader Must Do  Kelly McParland, National Post

The 7 Secrets of 2020  Yanis Varoufakis, Project Syndicate

Russia🇷🇺/Baltic – Building Trust Between Russia and the Baltic Sea Region by Per Carlsen | Carnegie Russia

China/Diplomacy Year in a Word: Wolf Warrior  Tom Mitchell, Financial Times

Preventing a Crisis With North Korea  Victor Cha, CSIS

The Next Pandemic May Be Closer Than You Think  Jörg Phil Friedrich, Worldcrunch

China Wades Into Nepal’s Political Crisis  Sudha Ramachandran, The Diplomat

Capital markets – Global banks generate record $125bn fee haul in 2020 | Financial Times

US🇺🇸 – Biden Must End the Forever Wars By David Klion | The Nation

Brexit : Londres et Bruxelles sont arrivés à un accord | Une année pas comme les autres: 2020 en images | Votre briefing du jeudi

« Il est difficile d’imaginer offrir des ensembles de livres de sociologie pour les cadeaux de Noël, ce serait tout à fait impensable » – Pierre Bourdieu


Azra Isakovic

Good Evening

Your Thursday Briefing: What you should know for Thursday, December 24

Brexit : Londres et Bruxelles sont arrivés à un accord Les Echos

Covid-19 – Emmanuel Macron, Free of Covid-19 Symptoms, Leaves Isolation, By Constant Méheut | The New York Times

Brexit – Britain and E.U. Scramble to Reach Brexit Deal Before Christmas Mark Landler | The New York Times

Book Review – The Sociologist and the Historian by Pierre Bourdieu and Roger Chartier by Canan Bolel | LSE Review of Books

Sociologie – Jaurès, Durkheim, Lévi-Strauss : il y a un siècle, quand les sciences sociales étaient socialistes Par Chloé Leprince |  France Culture

EU/China – Paris will block EU-China deal, says trade minister |  POLITICO Europe

China – How to Deter China: Enter the Democratic Armada  James Holmes, 1945

China/Asia – Will China Turn Off Asia’s Tap?  Brahma Chellaney, Project Syndicate

US/Russia With Biden’s New Threats, the Russia Discourse is More Reckless and Dangerous Than Ever | Glenn Greenwald

Covid19 – Maybe Freedom is Having No Followers to Lose by Zeynep Tufekci

Russia – Has Navalny’s Prank Finally Shattered the FSB Myth?  Sergey Radchenko, M. Times

China/India – The SCO’s Limited Role in Easing India-China Tensions    James MacHaffie, Jamestown

Azerbaijan – A Pyrrhic Victory for Azerbaijan?  Ido Vock, New Statesman

Turkey/Erdogan Erdogan’s Political Challengers Are Getting Tougher  Bobby Ghosh, Japan Times

2020 – A Year Like No Other: 2020 in Pictures | The New York Times

Pierre Bourdieu & Robert Chartier – Série de 5 entretiens

We hope you have a Merry festive period and we’ll see you in 2021.

Merry Christmas! Joyeux Noël!

#Brexit/#Covid19/ Boris Johnson et l’effondrement du #Leadership_Chaos | The Intelligence Dilemma – Les Américains se bousculent donc pour savoir ce que les Russes ont vu… | Biden veut convoquer un «sommet international pour la démocratie». Il ne devrait pas | Votre briefing du mercredi 23 décembre 2020

Turn on to politics, or politics will turn on you.
Ralph Nader


Azra Isakovic

Bonjour

Votre briefing du matin : ce que vous devez savoir pour le mercredi 23 décembre

US/Russia – The Intelligence Dilemma, by George Friedman | Geopolitical Futures

Asia Pacific – Japan and South Korea scramble jets to track Russian and Chinese bomber patrol | Justin Mccurry | The Guardian

Biden Transition – Biden wants to convene an international ‘Summit for Democracy’. He shouldn’t | David Adler and Stephen Wertheim | The Guardian

US – Can Democracy Hold Us Together? | Patrick J. Buchanan

Boris Johnson and the Collapse of Chaos as Leadership  Daniel Fortin, Les Echos

Why America Needs a Foreign Policy Reset  Dimitri Simes, National Interest

How We Can Help the Chinese People  Joseph Bosco, The Hill

Will Pakistan’s Military Lose Its Grip on Power?  Aqil Shah, Foreign Affairs

Joe Biden Discovers Russia  Leon Aron, The Dispatch

Russia, U.S. Interests, and Global Economic Stability  J. Haberman, Russia Matters

No End in Sight to Yemen’s Misery  Robbie Gramer, Foreign Policy

A Diplomatic Agenda for the Syrian Puzzle  Charles Thépaut, Washington Institut

Merkel pousse l’accord UE🇪🇺/Chine🇨🇳 – mais à quel prix? | Confrontation ÉtatsUnis🇺🇸/Russie🇷🇺 est à un pas de la guerre | Macron a le même problème que le roi Louis XVI | Votre briefing du mardi

Politique: un conflit d’intérêts déguisé en un concours de principes.
La conduite des affaires publiques pour un avantage privé.
Ambrose Bierce


Azra Isakovic

Par Azra Isakovic

Dec. 22, 2020

Bonjour

Books/Review Orthodoxy of the Elites, by Jackson Lears | The New York Review of Books

EU/China Merkel pushes the EU-China deal – but at what price? by Silke Wettach | WirtschaftsWoche

China and Taiwan: What to Expect in 2021  Ying-Yu Lin, The Diplomat

Why India’s Farmers Wont Stop Protesting  S. Gupta & S. Ganguly, Foreign Policy

Enough With Johnson’s Reckless Optimism  Clare Foges, Times of London

Corruption Cuts Both Ways in Russia’s Surveillance State  L. Bershidsky, BB

John Le Carré’s London of Exiles Is Alive and Well  David Patrikarakos, Spectator

Why Putin Feels Vindicated by the Pandemic  Kadri Liik, ECFR

Protection Without Protectionism  Shannon O’Neil, Foreign Affairs

How 2020 Shaped U.S.-China Relations  Elizabeth Economy et al, CFR

Brexit and the Brussels Effect  Paul De Grauwe, Project Syndicate

Has U.S. Found Sweet Spot With S-400 Sanctions?  Daniel Fried, Atlantic Council

Russia/US An ‘Act of War?’ Avoiding a Dangerous Crisis in Cyberspace, by Dmitri Trenin | Carnegie Russia

China’s Message Control  Jessica Batke & Mareike Ohlberg, ChinaFile

How China Exposed CIA Operatives in Africa, Europe  Zach Dorfman, Foreign Policy

Either U.S. Leads on Crypto, or China Will  Bill Zeiser, RealClearPolicy

The Subversion of History Education in Scotland  Jill Stephenson, Spectator

Did the Arab Uprisings Really Fail?  Frederick Deknatel, World Politics Review

Macron Has the Same Problem as Louis XVI  Lionel Laurent, Japan Times

After Escape: The New Climate Power Politics, by Adam Tooze | Journal e-flux #114 – December 2020

Le nom de Gaïa. À propos d’un malentendu moderne, par Déborah Bucchi | Revue Germinal

Your Monday Briefing – Votre briefing du lundi

“All men are born free: just not for long.” John le Carré


Azra Isakovic

By Azra Isakovic

Dec. 21, 2020

Good morning

Covid-19 – The Coronavirus Is Mutating. What Does That Mean for Us? | The New York Times

TechnologySocial Networking 2.0 | Stratechery

Books Architectures of Violence – The Command Structures of Modern Mass Atrocities by Kate Ferguson | Hurst Publishers

Books – “Mission Economy – a moonshot guide to changing capitalism” by Mariana Mazzucato | Harper Business

EXCLUSIVE: Jared Kushner helped create a Trump campaign shell company that secretly paid the president’s family members and spent $617 million in reelection cash, by Tom LoBianco, Dave Levinthal | Business Insider

Covid-19 – Effective leadership is the ultimate vaccine against coronavirus, by Peter Singer | The Independent

Covid-19 – How Science Beat the Virus, by Ed Yong | The Atlantic

Technology/China – No ‘Negative’ News: How China Censored the Coronavirus, by Raymond Zhong, Paul Mozur, Jeff Kao et Aaron Krolik | The New York Times

Energy – Coal 2020 – Analysis – IEA

Joe Biden/Foreign PolicyThe Demise of American Exceptionalism, by David Bromwich | National Interest

China/Taiwan – A Berlin Strategy: How Should America Respond to China’s Taiwan Threats, by by James Holmes | National Interest

Biosécurité et politique par Giorgio Agamben

The_Triumph_of_Death_by_Pieter_Bruegel_the_Elder-2048x1461

Le triomphe de la mort, par Pieter Bruegel l’Ancien

Ce qui frappe dans les réactions aux dispositifs exceptionnels qui ont été mis en place dans notre pays (et pas seulement dans celui-ci), c’est l’incapacité de les observer au-delà du contexte immédiat dans lequel ils semblent fonctionner. Rares sont ceux qui tentent à la place, ainsi qu’une analyse politique sérieuse devrait le faire, de les interpréter comme les symptômes et les signes d’une expérience plus large, dans laquelle un nouveau paradigme de gouvernement des hommes et des choses est en jeu. Déjà dans un livre publié il y a sept ans, qui mérite aujourd’hui d’être relu attentivement (Tempêtes microbiennes, Gallimard 2013), Patrick Zylberman a décrit le processus par lequel la sécurité sanitaire, jusque-là restée en marge des calculs politiques, devenait un élément essentiel des stratégies politiques nationales et internationales. L’enjeu n’est rien de moins que la création d’une sorte de «terreur sanitaire» comme outil pour gouverner ce qui a été appelé le pire scénario, le pire scénario. C’est selon cette logique du pire que déjà en 2005 l’organisation mondiale de la santé avait annoncé « deux à 150 millions de morts de la grippe aviaire en route », suggérant une stratégie politique que les États n’étaient pas encore prêts à accepter à l’époque. Zylberman Patrick Zylbermanmontre que le dispositif proposé était divisé en trois points: 1) construction, sur la base d’un risque possible, d’un scénario fictif, dans lequel les données sont présentées de manière à favoriser les comportements qui permettent de gouverner une situation extrême; 2) adoption de la logique du pire comme régime de rationalité politique; 3) l’organisation intégrale du corps des citoyens afin de renforcer au maximum l’adhésion aux institutions gouvernementales, produisant une sorte de civisme superlatif dans lequel les obligations imposées sont présentées comme preuve d’altruisme et le citoyen n’a plus le droit à la santé (health safety), mais devient juridiquement obligé à la santé (biosecurity).

Ce que Zylberman a décrit en 2013 s’est maintenant produit à temps. Il est évident qu’au-delà de la situation d’urgence liée à un certain virus qui pourrait à l’avenir laisser la place à un autre, c’est la conception d’un paradigme de gouvernement dont l’efficacité dépasse de loin celle de toutes les formes de gouvernement que l’histoire politique de l’Occident a connu jusqu’à présent. Si déjà, dans le déclin progressif des idéologies et des croyances politiques, les raisons de sécurité avaient permis de faire accepter aux citoyens des limitations des libertés qu’ils n’étaient pas disposés à accepter auparavant, la biosécurité s’est démontrée capable de présenter l’absolue cessation de toute activité politique et de tout rapport social comme la forme maximale de participation civique. Ainsi a-t-on pu constater le paradoxe d’organisations de gauche, traditionnellement habituées à revendiquer des droits et à dénoncer des violations de la constitution, acceptant sans réserve des limitations des libertés décidées par des arrêtés ministériels dépourvus de toute légalité et que même le fascisme n’avait jamais rêvé de pouvoir imposer.

Si déjà, dans le déclin progressif des idéologies et des croyances politiques, les raisons de sécurité avaient permis de faire accepter aux citoyens des limitations des libertés qu’ils n’étaient pas disposés à accepter auparavant, la biosécurité s’est démontrée capable de présenter l’absolue cessation de toute activité politique et de tout rapport social comme la forme maximale de participation civique.

Il est évident – et les autorités gouvernementales elles-mêmes ne cessent de nous le rappeler – que la soi-disant « distanciation sociale » deviendra le modèle de la politique qui nous attend et qui (comme les représentants d’une soi-disant task force, dont les membres sont dans un conflit de intérêt pour la fonction qu’ils devraient exercer, ont-ils annoncé) profiteront de cette mise à distance pour remplacer partout les dispositifs technologiques numériques aux relations humaines dans leur physicalité, qui sont devenues de tels soupçons de contagion (contagion politique, bien sûr). Les cours universitaires, comme le MIUR [1] l’a déjà recommandé, seront en ligne de manière stable à partir de l’année prochaine, vous ne vous reconnaîtrez plus en regardant votre visage, ce qui Il doit être couvert par un masque de santé, mais à travers des appareils numériques qui reconnaîtront les données biologiques qui sont collectées obligatoirement et tout « rassemblement », qu’il soit fait pour des raisons politiques ou simplement d’amitié, continuera d’être interdit.

Après que la politique ait été remplacée par l’économie, maintenant même pour gouverner, elle devra être intégrée au nouveau paradigme de biosécurité, auquel tous les autres besoins devront être sacrifiés. Il est légitime de se demander si une telle société peut encore être définie comme humaine ou si la perte de relations sensibles, du visage, de l’amitié, de l’amour peut être réellement compensée par une sécurité sanitaire abstraite et vraisemblablement entièrement fictive.

Il s’agit d’une conception entière des destins de la société humaine dans une perspective qui à bien des égards semble avoir assumé l’idée apocalyptique d’une fin du monde des religions maintenant à leur coucher du soleil. Après que la politique ait été remplacée par l’économie, maintenant même pour gouverner, elle devra être intégrée au nouveau paradigme de biosécurité, auquel tous les autres besoins devront être sacrifiés. Il est légitime de se demander si une telle société peut encore être définie comme humaine ou si la perte de relations sensibles, du visage, de l’amitié, de l’amour peut être réellement compensée par une sécurité sanitaire abstraite et vraisemblablement entièrement fictive.

Source:  Biosicurezza e politica

[1] Ministère de l’Instruction, de l’Université et de la Recherche.

Réflexions sur la peste par Giorgio Agamben

virus-1-1-(1)

Les réflexions suivantes ne concernent pas l’épidémie, mais ce que nous pouvons comprendre des réactions qu’elle provoque chez l’homme. Il s’agit donc de réfléchir à la facilité avec laquelle une société entière a accepté de se sentir contaminée par la peste, de s’isoler chez elle et de suspendre ses conditions normales de vie, ses liens de travail, d’amitié, d’amour, et même ses convictions religieuses et politiques. Pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas eu, comme c’était néanmoins imaginable et comme cela se produit habituellement dans de tels cas, des protestations et des oppositions ? L’hypothèse que je voudrais suggérer est que, d’une certaine manière, et pourtant inconsciemment, la peste était déjà là, que de toute évidence les conditions de vie des gens étaient devenues telles qu’un signe soudain suffisait pour qu’elles apparaissent pour ce qu’elles étaient – que c’est, intolérable, tout comme une peste. Et c’est, en quelque sorte, la seule chose positive que nous puissions tirer de la situation actuelle: il est possible que, plus tard, les gens commencent à se demander si le mode de vie qu’ils avaient était bon.

Et ce à quoi il ne faut pas moins penser, c’est le besoin de religion que la situation révèle. Dans le discours martial des médias, la terminologie empruntée au vocabulaire eschatologique pour décrire le phénomène revient de manière obsessionnelle, surtout dans la presse américaine, au mot «apocalypse» et évoque souvent explicitement la fin du monde. C’est comme si le besoin religieux, que l’Église n’est plus en mesure de satisfaire, cherchait à tâtons un autre lieu et le trouvait dans ce qui est devenu la religion de notre temps: la science. Cela, comme toute religion, peut produire de la superstition et de la peur ou, au moins, être utilisé pour la propager. Jamais auparavant nous n’avons assisté au spectacle, typique des religions en temps de crise, d’opinions et de prescriptions différentes et contradictoires, allant de la position hérétique minoritaire (néanmoins représentée par des scientifiques prestigieux) de ceux qui nient la gravité du phénomène à l’orthodoxie dominante discours qui l’affirme et, cependant, diverge souvent radicalement sur la manière de le traiter. Et, comme toujours dans de tels cas, certains experts ou ces experts autoproclamés parviennent à obtenir la faveur du monarque qui, comme au temps des conflits religieux qui divisaient le christianisme, prend parti pour un courant ou un autre et impose ses mesures selon ses intérêts.

Une autre chose qui donne à réfléchir est l’effondrement évident de chaque conviction et croyance commune. On dirait que les hommes ne croient plus à rien – sauf à la simple existence biologique qui doit être sauvée à tout prix. Mais seule une tyrannie peut être fondée sur la peur de perdre la vie, seul le monstrueux Léviathan avec son épée tirée.

Une autre chose qui donne à réfléchir est l’effondrement évident de chaque conviction et croyance commune. On dirait que les hommes ne croient plus à rien – sauf à la simple existence biologique qui doit être sauvée à tout prix. Mais seule une tyrannie peut être fondée sur la peur de perdre la vie, seul le monstrueux Léviathan avec son épée tirée.

Pour cette raison – une fois que l’urgence, la peste, sera déclarée terminée, si elle le sera – je ne pense pas que, du moins pour ceux qui ont conservé un minimum de clarté, il sera possible de recommencer à vivre comme avant. Et c’est peut-être la chose la plus désespérée aujourd’hui – même si, comme cela a été dit, « ce n’est que pour ceux qui n’ont plus d’espoir que l’espoir a été donné ».

Source : Giorgio Agamben, Riflessioni sulla peste