Your Wednesday Briefing

« A generation which ignores history has no past and no future. »
Robert Heinlein


By Azra Isakovic

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Wednesday Briefing

Featured

US – Why Joe Biden’s Afghanistan withdrawal doesn’t mark the end of America’s “forever war” Samuel Moyn | New Statesman World

Books

Philanthropie – Philanthropes en démocratie par Anne Monier | Puf/Vie des idées
Life – A Day in the Life of Abed Salama, Nathan Thrall | The New York Review of Books
Médias –  L’Information est un bien public Julia Cagé, Benoît Huet | Editions du Seuil

Must-Reads

Human Rights – Rights Group Hits Israel With Explosive Charge: Apartheid, Patrick Kingsley | The New York Times
Human Rights – Abusive Israeli Policies Constitute Crimes of Apartheid | Human Rights Watch
Médias –  « L’information est un bien public » : le plan de bataille pour la probité et la liberté des médias, par Aude Dassonville | Le Monde
EU/Technology – The EU path towards regulation on artificial intelligence, Valeria Marcia and Kevin C. Desouza | Brookings
UK – Moving Past the Troubles: The Future of Northern Ireland Peace, Charles Landow and James McBride | CFR
India – India’s Catastrophe: Illness, Everywhere  Jeffrey Gettleman | New York Times
Russia – The Urgent Need for Improved Cyber Defense  Paul Kolbe | Russia Matters
China/US – China Is Wrong About U.S. Decline  Martin Wolf | Financial Times
Russia/ Czech Republic – Russian State Terrorism Has Triggered the Biggest Fallout with the Czech Republic since 1989, Adéla Klečková | GMF
EU/Defence – Charting a new course: How Poland can contribute to European defence Karolina Muti | ECFR
China/Taiwan – Could China Blockade Taiwan?  Simon Leitch | National Interest
China/US – Four Ways a China-U.S. War at Sea Could Play Out  James Stavridis | Bloomberg
US/Biden – Biden’s Philosophy of “As If” | Bruno Maçães
US/Biden – Biden’s Dreampolitik at Home and Abroad, Bruno Maçães | American Affairs Journal | American Affairs

Research & Analysis

Corruption/Europe – How to fight corruption and uphold the rule of law, Carmino Mortera-Martinez | Centre for European Reform/Open Society Institute
Israel – “A Threshold Crossed: Israeli Authorities and the Crimes of Apartheid and Persecution,” | Human Rights Watch
UK/EU/Germany – Germany, the EU and Global Britain: So Near, Yet So Far: How to Link “Global Britain” to European Foreign and Security Policy, Claudia Major and Nicolai von Ondarza | SWP

Podcasts

Climate – How Radical Is President Joe Biden On Climate? Aaron Bastani & Adam Tooze | Downstream

Your Monday Briefing

Of all possessions a friend is the most precious.
Herodotus


By Azra Isakovic

Monday, April 19, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Monday Briefing

Featured

France/Sahel – Philanthropic Imperialism, Stephen W. Smith | London Review of Books

Books

Books interview –Laurent Binet: ‘In France, I just feel like we are lost in space’, Alex Preston | Guardian Books
About – Louis Menand : “The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War,” by Marc Tracy | The New York

Must-Reads

Guaranteed Work –Does it make sense to question the morality of capitalism? Laura Pennacchi  | Social Europe
Financial NewsChina Officially Backs A Crypto Currency And Establishes It As Their Official Coin,  Shen Haixiong | Forbes
UK –Understanding Britain’s New Strategic Outlook  Ryan Evans | War on the Rocks
Ukraine/Russia – Why All-Out Ukraine-Russia War Is Unlikely  Liana Semchuk | The Conversation
US/China – Did China Simulate Attack on U.S. Carrier?  Stephen Silver | 1945
US – America’s Come-From-Behind Pandemic Victory  Hal Brands | Foreign Policy
China – Can China’s New Trade Strategy Hit the Right Buttons?  Wang Yong | EA Forum
Jordan –Inside Jordan’s royal crisis: why the prince turned to tribal leaders for support, Mehul Srivastava and Andrew England | FT
Economy – Forget identity politics: economics is what matters now, Simon Kuper | FT Weekend Magazine

Research & Analysis

China/Foreign Policy – What Do Overseas Visits Reveal about China’s Foreign Policy Priorities? | CSIS
US/EU/Economy – The US proposals on digital services taxes and minimum tax rates: How the EU should respond, Zach Meyers | Centre for European Reform
COVID-19/Recover – To recover from COVID-19, downtowns must adapt, Tracy Hadden Loh Joanne Kim | Brookings

Podcasts

How did the Iraq catastrophe happen?

Hosted by award-winning reporter Noreen Malone, the fifth season of Slow Burn explores the people and ideas that propelled the country into the Iraq war, and the institutions that failed to stop it.

Your Monday Briefing

“Absolute power demoralizes.”  Lord Acton


By Azra Isakovic

Monday, April 12, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Monday Briefing

Featured

Big Tech – Meet the Professor Who’s Warning the World About Facebook and Google, Sarah Brown | The Chronicle of Higher Education

Books

Social Psychology – The Quick Fix: Why Fad Psychology Can’t Cure Our Social Ills Jesse Singal | Amazon
Nationalism – 100 Best Nationalism Books of All Time |  BookAuthority
Review – Are We Living in an Age of Strongmen? David A. Bell | The Nation

Must-Reads

EU – Brussels faces battle on new pan-EU revenue sources, Sam Fleming and Jim Brunsden | Financial Times
Europe – Les Capitales | EURACTIV France @EURACTIV_FR
Turquie/Italie – La Turquie suspend des contrats italiens à la suite de commentaires de Mario Draghi | EURACTIV France
Iran – Blackout Hits Iran Nuclear Site in What Appears to Be Israeli Sabotage By Ronen Bergman, Rick Gladstone and Farnaz Fassihi | The New York Times 
US/Iran/JCPOA – Hawks preview strategy to oppose Biden’s ‘woke’ Iran policy, Matthew Petti | Responsible Statecraft
Social Psychology –The False Promise of Quick-Fix, Jesse Singal | The Wall Street Journal
Essay – Philip, Prince of Nowhere Ed West | UnHerd
US – Crisis of Command Risa Brooks, Jim Golby et Heidi Urben | Foreign Affairs
Pandemic – The Gaslighting of Science by Zeynep Tufekci | Insight
UK Security Review – A Post Mortem of a Disintegrated Review, Jack Watling  | RUSI
US/Iran/JCPOA – For true JCPOA re-entry, Biden must tear down this sanctions wall, Tyler Cullis | Responsible Statecraft
Technology –Europe in the Geopolitics of Technology, Alice Pannier | Ifri

Research & Analysis

Japan/Africa – Japan’s Economic Diplomacy in Africa: Between Strategic Priorities and Local Realities, Céline Pajon | Ifri
EU/Defence – Europe’s Missile Defence and Italy: Capabilities and Cooperation, Alessandro Marrone, Karolina Muti | IAI
UK Security Review – Defence in a competitive age | GOV.UK
Iraq – 18 Years of Terror and Destruction, by Hannah Mulhern and Razan al-Shammari | GICJ
Russia/China/Arctic – Partners, Competitors, or a Little of Both?  Jim Townsend and Andrea Kendall-Taylor | CNAS

Podcasts

Political Economy – The future of capitalism, Branko Milanovic  | AEI Economics

Strongmen – Mussolini to Present | YouTube

De La Revue Intégrée du Gouvernement Britannique, par Dmitri Trenin

La Revue Intégrée de la sécurité, de la défense, du développement et de la politique étrangère publiée par le gouvernement britannique à la fin du mois de mars est un document des plus remarquables : innovant, tourné vers l’avenir et complet. Parallèlement à l’accent mis sur les outils non militaires de politique étrangère, le Royaume-Uni prévoit le plus gros investissement dans la défense depuis la fin de la guerre froide et la croissance substantielle de son arsenal de dissuasion nucléaire. En tant que modèle de stratégie moderne, il s’agit d’un modèle utile pour structurer les interactions d’un pays dans le monde globalisé.

L’impression générale de la Revue Intégrée est que les modifications importantes apportées au document ne modifient guère l’orientation principale de la politique étrangère du Royaume-Uni. La Revue décrit avant tout le Royaume-Uni comme une nation commerçante, ce qui, bien entendu, l’a toujours été. L’accent est clairement mis sur la science et la technologie, ce qui est un signe des temps. Le soft power britannique, toujours impressionnant, est dûment mis en avant. Nouvellement divorcée de l’Union européenne, la Grande-Bretagne est loin d’être la seule: sa relation vitale avec les États-Unis – bilatéralement et par le biais de l’OTAN – est devenue encore plus forte.

Dans le domaine de la géopolitique, le Royaume-Uni se distancie de l’UE, tout en s’identifiant comme une puissance européenne. À ce titre, il se rapproche encore plus de la communauté des nations anglophones bâtie autour des États-Unis, avec l’Australie, le Canada et la Nouvelle-Zélande: les Five Eyes.

Dans le domaine de la géopolitique, le Royaume-Uni se distancie de l’UE, tout en s’identifiant comme une puissance européenne. À ce titre, il se rapproche encore plus de la communauté des nations anglophones bâtie autour des États-Unis, avec l’Australie, le Canada et la Nouvelle-Zélande: les Five Eyes. Au sein de cette communauté mondiale très soudée, la Grande-Bretagne est la composante européenne. Dans les circonstances actuelles, les Five Eyes sont en train de devenir bien plus qu’un mécanisme de partage de renseignements. Il devrait maintenant être considéré comme l’élément central du système mondial dirigé par les États-Unis, son cercle intime.

Dans ce contexte, La Revue Intégrée du Royaume-Uni doit être interprété à juste titre comme étant pleinement intégré à la stratégie mondiale des États-Unis, comme indiqué dans le guide stratégique de sécurité nationale des États-Unis récemment publié. La devise de l’administration Joe Biden, «reconstruire en mieux», a été pleinement adoptée par les auteurs de la revue britannique. Il y a aussi une forte composante idéologique dans le journal britannique, comme dans les directives américaines, indiquant l’offensive / contre-offensive en cours contre la Chine et la Russie en tant que régimes autoritaires. Il vise à créer un ordre international basé sur les idées, les normes, les règles et les standards partagés par les membres du système occidental actuel dirigé par les États-Unis.

En effet, la préservation du statu quo dans le monde n’est pas considérée comme une option; l’objectif est d’élargir la démocratie, les sociétés ouvertes et les droits de l’homme, ce qui signifie récupérer la position dominante de l’Occident.

La façon d’y parvenir, semble suggérer la Revue, est de monter un effort occidental collectif sous la direction des États-Unis, avec le Royaume-Uni comme le plus proche allié des États-Unis. Malgré la prétendue approche réaliste de la politique étrangère et la volonté déclarée de compromis, tant le réalisme que le compromis ne peuvent être de nature tactique que lorsque Londres poursuit sa politique étrangère revigorée. Dans la compétition systémique contre les autoritaires et leurs alliés, il ne semble pas y avoir de substitut à la victoire.

L’orientation géopolitique de la Revue Intégrée penche vers l’Indo-Pacifique, où le Royaume-Uni cherche à être l’acteur européen. Tout en étant aux côtés des États-Unis et de ses alliés régionaux, le Royaume-Uni aspire également à promouvoir ses intérêts économiques dans la région du monde à la croissance la plus rapide. Il espère faire revivre et repenser les liens remontant à l’époque de l’empire, notamment avec l’Inde. Il est intéressant de noter que le Royaume-Uni tente d’équilibrer l’approche de base de la Chine en tant que principal challenger du système dirigé par les États-Unis avec sa propre volonté et sa volonté de collaborer avec Pékin sur un éventail de questions, tout en faisant des affaires rentables avec l’énorme puissance économique croissante . Cela ressemble à un acte de jonglerie complexe.

L’orientation géopolitique de la Revue Intégrée penche vers l’Indo-Pacifique, où le Royaume-Uni cherche à être l’acteur européen. Tout en étant aux côtés des États-Unis et de ses alliés régionaux, le Royaume-Uni aspire également à promouvoir ses intérêts économiques dans la région du monde à la croissance la plus rapide. Il espère faire revivre et repenser les liens remontant à l’époque de l’empire, notamment avec l’Inde

La Revue Intégrée nomme les «menaces étatiques» comme les plus pertinentes, et bien qu’elle qualifie la Chine de principal challenger systémique, elle réserve à la Russie la position de «menace la plus grave pour notre sécurité». La Russie est classée dans la même catégorie que l’Iran et la Corée du Nord en tant que nation la plus hostile. Le Royaume-Uni promet à ses alliés de l’OTAN une posture de défense plus robuste vis-à-vis de la Russie; il réaffirme son soutien aux pays d’Europe orientale; et il prévoit de poursuivre l’assistance militaire à l’Ukraine. La décision d’augmenter l’arsenal nucléaire du Royaume-Uni vise également clairement la Russie.

La Revue Intégrée mentionne à plusieurs reprises les empoisonnements de Salisbury et l’ingérence russe. Nulle part dans le document il n’y a un mot sur une coopération possible avec la Russie sur quelque question que ce soit – contrairement à la Chine, pour ne pas parler de nombreux autres pays. Cela a incité l’ambassadeur de Russie à Londres, Andrei Kelin, à conclure que les relations politiques entre le Royaume-Uni et la Russie sont désormais de facto inexistantes. L’examen intégré implique qu’il ne peut y avoir de coopération avec Moscou tant que le gouvernement russe ne modifie pas ses politiques de manière fondamentale ou n’est pas remplacé par un gouvernement avec un programme politique très différent.

Moscou prend probablement ces déclarations et propositions d’actions au sérieux, mais sans grande inquiétude : les relations vont de mal en pis depuis des années.

Moscou prend probablement ces déclarations et propositions d’actions au sérieux, mais sans grande inquiétude : les relations vont de mal en pis depuis des années. Il reconnaît que le gouvernement britannique mène une politique hostile à l’égard de la Russie en étroite coordination et coopération avec les États-Unis. Cela signifie que les relations entre la Russie et le Royaume-Uni sont essentiellement aussi conflictuelles que celles entre la Russie et les États-Unis. Concrètement, Moscou devra surveiller de plus près les actions britanniques dans les quartiers post-soviétiques de la Russie, du Bélarus et de l’Ukraine au Caucase et en Asie centrale.

Cet état de fait est là pour le long terme et n’est guère nouveau. À certains égards, la situation rappelle vaguement à la fois le Grand Jeu et la Guerre froide – avec une mise en garde importante: il ne semble y avoir pratiquement aucun motif pour des relations civiles entre les gouvernements de Moscou et de Londres, et aucune chance pour le Royaume-Uni de jouer. un rôle de facilitateur entre Washington et Moscou comme il l’a fait pendant certaines parties de la guerre froide. Il est juste d’ajouter, bien entendu, que le Royaume-Uni ne recherche guère actuellement un tel rôle.

Pourtant, s’il est peu probable que les contacts politiques bilatéraux soient fréquents ou productifs, la Russie et le Royaume-Uni pourraient et devraient même s’engager mutuellement dans des cadres bilatéraux et multilatéraux sur une série de questions mondiales, en particulier le changement climatique, en vue de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le changement climatique ( COP26) à Glasgow cet automne; santé publique; la non-prolifération (le sort de l’accord nucléaire iranien); stabilité stratégique (le sommet proposé par la Russie des cinq membres permanents du Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies); et autre. Il est possible de débattre de certaines questions régionales, notamment au Moyen-Orient. D’autres contacts non politiques et non gouvernementaux, que ce soit dans le domaine des affaires, de la science et de la technologie, de l’éducation ou dans d’autres domaines, devraient être autorisés, quoique dans les limites de la confrontation en cours.


Par Dmitri Trenin

Source : UK Security Review: Implications for Russia

Traduction: Azra Isakovic