Your Friday Briefing

“You can do everything with bayonets, but you are not able to sit on them”
Otto Von Bismarck


By Azra Isakovic

Friday, March 26

Good morning

Welcome to Your Friday Briefing

Featured

Rousseau on Inequality – How Rousseau Predicted Trump, Pankaj Mishra | The New Yorker
Rousseau on InequalityDiscourse on Inequality, 1755 | AUB

Books

Freedom – Freedom – An Unruly History, Annelien de Dijn | Harvard University Press
Review – The Untold History of Freedom Tyler Stovall | The Nation
Review – Aboutness: On Hieronymus Bosch  T.J. Clark, London Review of Books
À propos de : Une histoire universelle des ruines. Des origines aux Lumières, Alain Schnapp | Seuil, par Géraldine Sfez | La Vie des idées

Must-Reads

EU/Vaccine – EU vaccine schism overshadows Biden’s summit cameo, Mehreen Khan and David Hindley | Financial Times
Turkey/Greece/EU/NATO – Where to Draw the Line in the Eastern Mediterranean, Michaël Tanchum, Foreign Policy
Nuclear Notebook – How many nuclear weapons does Russia have in 2021? By Hans M. Kristensen, Matt Korda | Bulletin of the Atomic
Japan/Taiwan/China –  What Can Japan Do in a Taiwan-China Clash?  Michael MacArthur Bosack, JT
US/China – There Will Not Be a New Cold War  Thomas Christensen | Foreign Affairs
China/Hong Kong – Hong Kong Is Just a Starting Point for China  Weifeng Zhong | The Dispatch
Nord Stream 2 – Maybe Washington Should Let Nord Stream 2 Go  Daniel DePetris | RCWorld
Myanmar – Don’t Ignore Myanmar  Benedict Rogers | Persuasion
EU/China – Europe’s Tightrope Diplomacy on China, Philippe Le Corre | Carnegie
China – What Beijing’s Capitol Riot Schadenfreude Reveals  J. Eisenman & H. Grizzell | FP
China – China’s Coming Demographic Collapse  Gordon Chang | National Interest
South Korea – Ambiguity Weakens South Korea  Shim Jae-yun | Korea Times
Health/Serbia/Western Balkans – Serbia’s Vaccine Influence in the Balkans, Heather A. Conley and Dejana Saric | CSIS

Research & Analysis

Economy – Fiscal and Exchange Rate Policies Drive Trade Imbalances, Joseph E. Gagnon and Madi Sarsenbayev | PIIE
US/Digital – Posture Statement of General Paul M. Nakasone, Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, Before the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee
Digital – Testimony of Mark Zuckerberg, Before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittees on Consumer Protection & Commerce and Communications & Technology
Economy – L’automobile, talon d’Achille de l’industrie allemande ? Marie Krpata | IFRI

Podcasts

Bertrand Tavernier : « Je fais un cinéma de partage » | France Culture
Bertrand Tavernier : Lyon, le cinéma et ses artistes | Archive INA

Talking Politics – Rousseau on Inequality | Acast

Your Friday Briefing

We should establish a chair for the teaching of reading between the lines.
Leon Bloy


By Azra Isakovic

Friday, March 19

Good morning

Welcome to Your Friday Briefing

Books

Health – The Next Shift : The Fall of Industry and the Rise of Health Care in Rust Belt America, Gabriel Winant | Harvard University Press
Philosophy – In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy, by Katrina Forrester | Princeton University Press

Must-Reads

Health – The Rise of Healthcare in Steel City, Gabriel Winant | Dissent Magazine
Health/EU – Has the EU Lost Its Mind? Peter Franklin | UnHerd
Nuclear Risk – An existential discussion: What is the probability of nuclear war? By Martin E. Hellman, Vinton G. Cerf | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Vaccination –The Elephant In the Room: Herd Immunity via Tragedy | Zeynep Tufekci
US/Libya – The Libya Allergy, Colum Lynch | Foreign Policy
Mali conflict – ‘It’s not about jihad or Islam, but justice’ Patricia Huon | The Guardian
Europe – Is Denmark creating an inverted-Apartheid? Peter Franklin | UnHerd
US/Strategy – Humility in American Grand Strategy  Mathew Burrows & Robert Manning | WOTR
US/Africa – Understanding the New U.S. Terrorism Designations in Africa  | Crisis Group
Vaccine – Vaccine Suspense: Why Some Countries Are So Cautious  P. Treble | Maclean’s
Germany – Merkel’s CDU Mired in Scandal, Incompetence  Melanie Amann et al | Der Spiegel

Research & Analysis

Germany/US/China – Germany Between a Rock and a Hard Place in China-US Competition, Markus Jaeger | DGAP
US/EU/Technology – What’s Ahead for a Cooperative Regulatory Agenda on Artificial Intelligence? Meredith Broadbent | CSIS
US/Extremism – Domestic Violent Extremism Poses Heightened Threat in 2021 | Office of the Director of National Intelligence
EU/CounterterrorismThe Next Steps for EU Counterterrorism Policy, Raphael Bossong | SWP

Podcasts

Commune de Paris – Les damnés de la Commune, Raphaël Meyssan | ARTE
Histoire – Debout les damnés de la terre, destins de communards, par Xavier Mauduit | France Culture

Commune de ParisDernière révolution avant la République (4/4), par Perrine Kervran | France Culture

Commune de Paris – Les damnés de la Commune, Raphaël Meyssan | ARTE

Your Friday Briefing

 » Réfléchir, c’est difficile. C’est pourquoi la plus part des gens jugent. »
Carl Gustav Jung


By Azra Isakovic

Friday, March 05

Good morning

Welcome to Your Friday Briefing

Books

Immigration – We’re Here Because You Were There, by Ian Sanjay Patel | Verso Books
History – Merpeople: A Human History, Vaughn Scribner | Reaktion Books
Books Reviewed – Merpeople: A Human History by Vaughn Scribner, Reaktion, by Marina Warner | The New York Review of Books
Poland – Europe’s Growth Champion by Marcin Piatkowski | Oxford Academic

Must-Reads

France – Is This the End of French Intellectual Life? Christopher Caldwell | New York Times Opinion
US vs China – Biden bets on alliances to push back against Beijing Demetri Sevastopulo | Financial Times
Nuclear Risk – French report grapples with nuclear fallout from Algerian War Austin Cooper | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Vaccine – “Britain’s outsourcing scandal”, by Robert Maisey | Le Monde diplomatique in English US/Germany – US hails German plan to send warship in China Sea | Euractiv
Big Bang – Distinguishing post-communist privatizations from the Big Bang, Branko Milanovic | globalinequality
Vaccine – Vaccine Efficacy, Statistical Power and Mental Models by zeynep tufekci
Russia – Biden’s Risky Russia Sanctions Game  Nikolas Gvosdev, Russia Matters
Yemen – Only a Strong White House Can End Yemen’s Civil War  Con Coughlin, The National
Africa – Great Power Competition Is Coming to Africa  M. Hicks, K. Atwell & D. Collini, FA
Economic behaviour – Witch hunts in pre-modern Germany | Aeon+Psyche
US/Iran – The US, Iran and Bargaining Positions  George Friedman | Geopolitical Futures
US – A Foreign Policy for the American People, Antony Blinken | Department of State

Research & Analysis

Nuclear Risk – Radioactivity Under the Sand by Jean-Marie Collin and Patrice Bouveret | Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung | ICAN France
Economy/Freedom – 2021 Index of Economic Freedom, Heritage Foundation
Digital – The Progressive Case for Universal Internet Access | Tony Blair Institute
Netherlands – Geopolitical Genesis: Dutch Foreign and Security Policy in a Post-COVID World, Clingendael/Hague Centre for Security Studies

Podcasts

Vaccin – Pourquoi le vaccin AstraZeneca suscite-t-il autant de réticences ? | France Culture

Argent –Les nazis et l’argent : au coeur du IIIe Reich | ARTE

   

Your Tuesday Briefing

We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office.
Aesop


By Azra Isakovic

Tuesday, February 23

Good morning

Welcome to Your Tuesday Briefing

Books

About : Bland Fanatics: Liberals, Race, and Empire, Pankaj Mishra, by Kanishk Tharoor | The New Republic
History – Can Historians Be Traumatized by History?  | The New Republic

Must-Reads

China –In the new Cold War: Germany wants to be neutral, India is increasingly pro-U.S., the Philippines is trending toward China, and Djibouti is a prized pawn | Bloomberg Opinion
Russia – Putin’s Killers: Russia’s 5 Most Powerful Weapons for Sale  National Interest
Joe Biden – Biden’s brief window to fix the world’s broken institutions, Adam Triggs | East Asia Forum
US/China – The Sino-American War of 2025: A Future History  Michael Auslin, Spectator
UK/Economy – Keeping up appearances: What now for UK services trade? Sam Lowe, Centre for European Reform 
US/Digital – From Washington to Florida, here are Big Tech’s biggest threats from states, Emily Birnbaum, Protocol 
US/China/Vaccine – The U.S.-China Global Vaccine Competition Derek Scissors & Dan Blumenthal | AEI

Research & Analysis

Nato/Proliferation – Reviewing NATO’s Non-proliferation and Disarmament Policy, by Katarzyna Kubiak | IAI  [PDF]
Nato/Digital – Cyber Defence in NATO Countries: Comparing Models, Alessandro Marrone and Ester Sabatino | IAI
OSCE – The Future of the OSCE, | The Wilson Center [PDF]
EU/Iran –Europe’s Defence of the Iran Nuclear Deal, by Riccardo Alcaro | The Intl Spectator || IAI | Taylor & Francis Research Insights
Covid19/Economy –Trade and Global Value Chains at the Time of Covid-19, Anna Maria Pinna & Luca Lodi | The Intl Spectator | IAI | Taylor & Francis Research Insights

 

Podcasts

UE/Iran – Europe’s Defence of the Iran Nuclear Deal: Less than a Success, More than a Failure

Your Monday Briefing

It has been well said that a hungry man is more interested in four sandwiches than four freedoms.
Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.


By Azra Isakovic

Monday, February 22

Good morning

Welcome to Your Monday Briefing

Books

Inequality – Divested Inequality in the Age of Finance, by Ken-Hou Lin and Megan Tobias Neely | Oxford Uni Press
À propos de: Divested. Inequality in the Age of Finance,  par Olivier Godechot  | La Vie des idées

Must-Reads

‘Islamogauchisme’ : Le piège de l’Alt-right se referme sur la Macronie, par David Chavalarias CNRS | Politoscope
Idéologies – Les mensonges d’« Apocalypse » par Pierre Grosser | Le Monde diplomatique
Ideas – It’ll Do – Impeachment did not prevail, but Trump still lost by David Frum | The Atlantic
US/Middle East – Biden says he will listen to experts by Marc Lynch & Shibley Telhami | Brookings
Science – « La fabrique de l’ignorance », par Mathias Girel | ARTE 
European values: Poland’s media fears a crackdown James Shotter | Financial Times
China/France – China’s state broadcaster applies to France for right to air in Europe  | Financial Times
Nuclear Risks –Nuclear Weapons and Declaratory Policy | War on the Rocks

Research & Analysis

US/Africa – Washington Consensus reforms and economic performance in sub-Saharan Africa, by Belinda Archibong Brahima S. Coulibaly, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala | via Brookings 📥 [PDF]
Nuclear Risks – Could blockchain technology help reduce nuclear risks, by Lyndon Burford | King’s College London 📥 [PDF]

Podcasts

Idéologies – Les mensonges d’« Apocalypse » par Pierre Grosser | Le Monde diplomatique

Etats-Unis/Iran – La diplomatie pourra-t-elle limiter l’ambition nucléaire de l’Iran ? | France Culture

Your Monday Briefing

The most important political office is that of the private citizen. Louis D. Brandeis


By Azra Isakovic

Monday, February 15

Good morning

Welcome to Your Monday Briefing

Books

À propos de : « La ville néolibérale » de Gilles Pinson | Puf
The Civic Foundations of Fascism in Europe, by Dylan Riley | Verso Books

Must-Reads

Why liberal democracies do not depend on truth, par Dylan Riley | NewStatesman
Pandemic – Critical Thinking isn’t Just a Process | Zeynep Tufekci
Big Tech – The EU is about to make Facebook even worse Steven Hill | International Politics & Society
Why Trump isn’t a fascist  Richard J Evans | NewStatesman 
Seth Abramson’s viral meta-journalism unreality, Lyz Lenz | CJR
Is 2021 the year of NFTs? | Bruno Maçães
When Allies Go Nuclear | ForeignAffairs
Joe Biden’s growing frustration with Europe yanks Britain out of the doghouse | The Times
Bitcoin’s rise reflects America’s decline, by Rana Foroohar | Financial Times
Covid19 – WHO: COVID-19 didn’t leak from a lab. Also WHO: Maybe it did, by Filippa Lentzos | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Covid-19 – Covid-19 pandemic: China ‘refused to give data’ to WHO team | BBC

Research & Analysis

US/Nuclear Why is America getting a new $100 billion nuclear weapon? Elisabeth Eaves | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
US/Nuclear – Nuclear Modernization under Competing Pressures | CSIS PDF
EU – Rule-bending debates in recent Finnish EU policy: Pacta sunt servanda? Saila Heinikoski | FIIA PDF
US – How America Changed During Donald Trump’s Presidency | Pew Research Center

Podcasts

TIAN – Un tigre de papier, le traité d’interdiction des armes nucléaires? | RFI





Your Friday Briefing

Tout pouvoir est une conspiration permanente.” Honoré de Balzac


By Azra Isakovic

Jan. 29, 2021

Good morning

Welcome to Your Friday Briefing

Books

Climat – « Climat, la démission permanente » par Cyrille Cormier | Editions Utopia | Decitre
Book Review – Last of the Libertines  Theodore Dalrymple, Law & Liberty
Essay – Harold Bloom’s ‘Rage for Reading’  Robert Gottlieb, The New York Times

Must-Reads

US – Biden administration pauses Trump’s foreign weapons sales, Connor O’Brien, Politico 
US/EU/Digital – 5 charts that explain the digital transatlantic relationship, Mark Scott, Politico   
EU/Health – How Europe fell behind on vaccines, Jillian Deutsch and Sarah Wheaton, Politico   
EU/UK/Health – Delays in covid-19 vaccine delivery are causing tempers to flare and timetables to slip, The Economist 
Arms Control – Saving the Open Skies Treaty, Steven Pifer, Brookings 
Turkey/Eastern Mediterranean – Turkey, Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean: Charting a way out of the current deadlock, Galip Dalay, Brookings  
Russia/Foreign Policy – Russian Foreign Policy in 2020, András Rácz (ed.), DGAP  
Germany/Russia/Energy – Nord Stream 2:Sanctions, Skullduggery and Solutions, Alan Riley, CEPA  
Iran Deal – Netanyahu’s Risky Gambit on Iran Deal  Kurtzer, Miller & Simon, Responsible Statecraft 


 

Research & Analysis

Corruption – Corruption Perceptions Index 2020, Transparency International 
Russia/Foreign Policy – Russian Foreign Policy in 2020, András Rácz (ed.), DGAP  
EU – Anti-Money Laundering in the EU, Karel Lannoo and Richard Parlour, CEPS 
China – The Longer Telegram: Toward a New China Strategy  Atlantic Council
China – Myths, Realities of China’s Military-Civil Fusion  Elsa Kania & Lorand Laskai, CNAS 
Bosnia and Herzegovina – Bosnia to war, to Dayton, and to its slow peace, Carl Bildt, ECFR 
Climate/Trade – Toward a Climate-Driven Trade Agenda, Jack Caporal and William Reinsch, CSIS  

Podcast      

Climat – La démission permanente |  France Inter

Welcome to your Tuesday briefing

One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things. Henry Miller


Azra Isakovic

Good morning and welcome to Tuesday, January 5.

Books

Books/Review – Unravelling liberal interventionism: local critiques of statebuilding in Kosovo, by Gëzim Visoka and Vjosa Musliu | International Affairs
Books/Review – Boris Johnson: The Gambler by Tom Bower review – the defining secret by Jonathan Freedland | The Guardian
Books – Turkey–West Relations, by Oya Dursun-Ozkanca | Cambridge University Press.

Featured Study 

Middle East Studies Journal –  The most popular articles of 2020 – free to access through 20th January | History at Cambridge
Asian Studies Journal – The most popular articles of 2020 – free to access through 15th January | History at Cambridge

Must-Reads 

Trade/China/EU – Europe Hands China a Strategic Victory  Gideon Rachman, Financial Times
Trade/China/EU – The EU Takes a Gamble With China  Constantin Eckner, Spectator
Trade/UK/EU – 10 key details in the UK-EU trade deal, Anna Isaac, Politico 
Trade/UK/Turkey – UK signs free trade agreement with Turkey, Bethan McKernan, The Guardian 
UK/Northern Ireland – The Irish Sea widens, The Economist 
UK/Scotland – Brexit changed the game on Scottish independence, Nicola Sturgeon, Politico 
UK/France –Never mind Brexit. Britain and France are condemned to work together,John Lichfield, Politico 
UK/EU/Education – UK pulls out of ‘extremely expensive’ Erasmus scheme, Cristina Gallardo, Politico
EU/China/Investment – Europe’s disappointing investment deal with China, Alicia Garcia-Herrero, Nikkei Asia 
The Biden Transition – What Biden Must Do to Restore U.S. Foreign Policy  Robert Kaplan, National Interest
The Biden Transition – Biden Faces no Shortage of Foreign Policy Problems  John McLaughlin, Ozy
The Biden Transition – Biden Inherits a Challenging Civil-Military Legacy  Jim Golby & Peter Feaver, WOTR

Digital/US – As Understanding of Russian Hacking Grows, So Does Alarm, David E. Sanger, Nicole Perlroth, Julian E. Barnes, New York Times 
Digital/US – We Can Take Advantage of the Russian Hack. Here’s How, Glenn S. Gerstell, Politico 
Tactical Nuclear Weapon – Do tactical nukes break international law? By Jaroslav Krasny | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Research & Analysis

Digital/EU – The EU’s Cybersecurity Strategy for the Digital Decade, European Commission
EU/China/Investment – Key elements of the EU-China Comprehensive Agreement on Investment, European Commission

Idées

Pandemie/Democratie – Comment s’engager en pandémie ? Avec Barbara Stiegler | France Culture

Europe – Sarajevo Revisited  Benjamin Moser, New York Review of Books

La pauvreté de la science politique par Georgy Kunadze

 Ce rôle ‘civilisatrice’ de l’arsenal nucléaire est à nouveau en grande demande en Russie qui se relève graduellement, tout en retournant aux ‘valeurs traditionnelles européennes telles que la souveraineté, un État fort, l’éthique chrétienne et les normes morales’. Et l’Occident ayant perdu ces valeurs, et « vaincus, commence à agir … en violation de presque toute norme morale, juridique ou politique, que l’Occident lui-même a proclamé. »

En Russie, le domaine de la science politique est dans un état de crise. Cela est évident non seulement dans les œuvres des mystiques de la géopolitique et les charlatans de l’école ‘patriotique’, mais aussi dans les réflexions superficiels de leurs adversaires autoproclamés : les courtisans ‘libéraux’ respectables. Avec les premiers c’est clair depuis longtemps: ils sont fanatiques et scélérats ordinaires, simple comme les râteaux. C’est moins évident avec le dernier groupe. Ils sont instruits, ils maîtrisent couramment et ‘non-patriotiquement’ les langues étrangères ; ils sont chez eux en toute capitale occidentale. Ils comprennent tout à la perfection. C’est avec des représentants de cette ‘classe éduquée’ ou le problème réside. russie003Certains ont traversé ouvertement du côté de la réaction et révèlent avec enthousiasme de la folie. D’autres  déguisent avec diligence  ses vus autoritaires dignes de l’homme des cavernes dans ses propres formes académiques.

Je voudrais aborder la dernière contribution à l’apologétique du régime de Poutine dans l’article Le Concert de Vienne du XXIe siècle, écrit par le politologue bien connu, Sergei Karaganov.

De quelle manière l’anniversaire est  glorifié?

L’article commence par l’éloge de ‘jubilé glorieux’ – le 200e anniversaire de la défaite de Napoléon, formalisée lors du Congrès de Vienne en 1815. Un Concert des Nations a été formé au Congrès et qui avait fourni, selon Karaganov,  ‘de la paix presque absolue en Europe depuis plusieurs décennies et de l’ordre relativement pacifique pour près d’un siècle’. Cette déclaration est très controversée parce que le Congrès de Vienne a abouti à la redéfinition des frontières en Europe, ouvrant la voie à de nouvelles guerres, et parce que le but de notoire Concert des Nations était un retour à l’ordre européen qui existait avant la Grande Révolution française.bnf001

Cependant, encore plus intéressant est la raison pour laquelle l’auteur estime que le Concert des Nations a été bénéfique. Selon Karaganov, ‘l’ordre pacifique’ en Europe a été construit  ‘sans humilier la France vaincue’, et les grandes puissances qui ont créé cet ordre pacifique ont été relativement homogène et ont été «gérés par des monarques autoritaires… qui partageaient des valeurs communes … ». L’allusion pour le traitement prétendument humiliante de la Russie après sa défaite dans la guerre froide est tout à fait évidente. En outre, le rêve naïf de faire revivre un ordre par lequel  ‘les souverains homogènes, autoritaires’ font des deals eux-mêmes est tout à fait bien évident.

 

Comment nous avons arrêtés de nous inquiéter et comment nous adorons la bombe


Karaganov indique également que, malgré ce que notre ‘souverain autoritaire’, Staline, a convenu avec ‘leurs souverains’ à Yalta, en Février 1945, de la Seconde Guerre mondiale est née un monde divisé, plutôt qu’un ‘concert’ des nations homogènes. Il y aurait eu une nouvelle guerre, poursuit-il, si le Dieu n’avait pas envoyé à l’humanité un arsenal nucléaire, qui a sauvé et continue à sauver ceux qui l’ont, tout en refusant la protection divine à ceux qui ont choisi de ne pas en avoir. Yalta001Renoncer à son arsenal nucléaire n’a pas sauvé la Libye, déplore l’auteur, ‘correctement’ en ignorant l’autre exemple, beaucoup plus évidente et récente – l’Ukraine. La décision de l’Ukraine de renoncer à ses armes nucléaires ne l’a pas aidé de se protéger contre l’agression de la Russie. Mais la possession des armes nucléaires de la Russie l’a aidé grandement: Si la Russie voudrait saisir toute l’Ukraine, personne ne se serait battu contre elle. Selon Karaganov, c’est exactement ça qui équivaut ‘au rôle civilisateur des armes nucléaires’ dans un monde où certains gouvernements sont ‘plus égaux que d’autres’ comme on les pourrait décrire en termes d’Orwell.

La décision de l’Ukraine de renoncer à ses armes nucléaires ne l’a pas aidé de se protéger contre l’agression de la Russie. Mais la possession des armes nucléaires de la Russie l’a aidé grandement: Si la Russie voudrait saisir toute l’Ukraine, personne ne se serait battu contre elle. Selon Karaganov, c’est exactement ça qui équivaut ‘au rôle civilisateur des armes nucléaires’ dans un monde où certains gouvernements sont ‘plus égaux que d’autres’ comme on les pourrait décrire en termes d’Orwell.

Ce rôle ‘civilisatrice’ de l’arsenal nucléaire est à nouveau en grande demande en Russie qui se relève graduellement, tout en retournant aux ‘valeurs traditionnelles européennes telles que la souveraineté, un État fort, l’éthique chrétienne et les normes morales’. Et l’Occident ayant perdu ces valeurs, et « vaincus, commence à agir … en violation de presque toute norme morale, juridique ou politique, que l’Occident lui-même a proclamé. »

‘À en juger par la rage actuelle contre la demande croissante pour le respect des intérêts de la Russie’, poursuit l’auteur d’un air suffisant, ‘le pays aurait été achevé … si ses ingénieurs faméliques, ses scientifiques et ses militaires n’avaient pas sauvegardé, grâce à leurs efforts héroïques, le potentiel nucléaire du pays dans les années 1990’. L’imagination vivement peinte dans un tableau épique: patriotes héroïques qui cachent le patrimoine le plus important du pays – son arsenal nucléaire – des cohortes avides d’Eltsine qui rêvaient de s’en débarrasser tandis que l’Ouest-Traître n’a eu qu’attendre pour terminer avec la Russie. Karaganov croit-il vraiment dans tous ces contes de fées? Je me souviens qu’il a écrit différemment dans les années 1990. Peut-être que l’auteur souffre de l’amnésie? Bien sûr que non. Il se souvient parfaitement de tout. Il a décidé tout simplement de botter en touche afin de suivre la tendance à l’ordre du jour.

À présent, Karaganov prévient que le processus pour que la Russie ‘se lève de ses genoux’ ne sera pas facile. Il parle encore de cette « réaction hautement rigide et même douloureuse de l’Occident à la politique russe qui vise à arrêter l’attaque sur ses intérêts en tentant d’attirer l’Ukraine dans sa zone d’influence et de contrôle ». Vraiment, quoi de plus naturel que de prendre un morceau d’un pays voisin ou l’incitation à une rébellion séparatiste dans un autre de ses régions? Ceux-ci sont strictement des mesures défensives et préventives par rapport à un État souverain qui vu de Russie soit dans sa sphère d’intérêts ‘légitimes’. Et l’utilisation de l’Occident de ses sanctions comme son «arsenal nucléaire économique» à lui est vouée à l’échec: parce que maintenant c’est clair à tous combien c’est dangereux de se fonder sur les institutions occidentales, ces règles, ces systèmes de paiement et ses devises.

Autres géopolitique traditionnelles

Karaganov conclut avec le retour du monde à la ‘géopolitique traditionnelle’, mais avec la mise en garde que ce sera ‘une autre géopolitique’ (apparemment les mots ‘traditionnel’ et ‘autres’ sont utilisés de manière interchangeable dans sa version de russe). Dans cette «autre géopolitique» la puissance militaire – à laquelle la Russie a compté si lourdement dans le ‘Conflit en Ukraine’ – sera d’une importance réduite. Économie jouera le rôle décisif parce que le bien-être de la population est la plus grande demande des masses. Tandis que tout ne va pas bien avec l’économie en Russie la Chine se porte bien. Et avec le Chinois, nous additionnons 1,5 milliard de personnes (la Chine a un 1,25 milliard et nous avons 140 millions). Le bloc économique le plus puissant dans le monde se lève sur l’Asie continentale – la Grande Commonwealth eurasienne – qui émergera avec l’Organisation de coopération de Shanghai (OCS) comme son noyau. Naturellement, il n’y a pas d’alternative à cela.Putin_and_Hu_JintaoPeace_Mission_2007 Le nouveau bloc sera ouvert aux pays de l’UE, tandis que le futur rôle des États-Unis n’est pas clair. Tout d’abord, laissons inutile élite américaine de décider ce qu’elle veut. Laissons les États-Unis de suivre l’exemple de la Russie et de son ‘élite de l’esprit global, de sa diplomatie de première classe et des avantages de sa géographie’. Mais d’abord, les États-Unis devraient au moins lever les sanctions contre la Russie, en reconnaissant à la Russie le droit légal de faire avec l’Ukraine comme elle lui plaît.

L’esprit ne peut pas comprendre comment juger les compétences et l’intégrité d’un politologue qui compose, en 2015, un traité dans lequel l’absolutisme du XIXe siècle est salué comme l’avenir radieux de l’humanité tout entière. Mais nous sommes dans une ère de la Russie, pour citer les frères Strougatski, quand « On n’a pas besoin de gens intelligents. Nous avons besoin de gens loyaux. »

Eh bien, mais la réalité est encore pire

Au début des années 1990, l’URSS a subi la défaite dans la ‘Guerre Froide’, le menant à la faillite de son système économique, politique, idéologique et gouvernemental. La Russie est devenue le successeur de l’URSS, puis elle a semblée à beaucoup, d’être, un état proto-démocratique et libre, capable de devenir, dans le temps, un membre digne de la communauté démocratique occidental. Une telle Russie n’était pas du tout le perdant de la guerre froide. Elle a été le vainqueur, un pays capable de se libérer du cercle vicieux de son grand, mais tragique destin. Le monde civilisé avait admiré une telle Russie, il lui a souhaité le succès et l’a aidée, pas toujours comme nous l’aurions voulu certes. Une telle Russie avait une crédibilité sans précédent dans le monde. Et elle avait regardé son avenir avec un optimisme quelque peu naïf certes. Puis vint de nombreux échecs et les erreurs: il s’est avéré que les vieilles habitudes indignes ont la vie longue. Les certains nouvelles-là, ne sont pas mieux. Et puis le malheur, habillé en vêtements blancs de succès, est venu: les prix mondiaux des hydrocarbures ont fortement augmenté. Inattendue, en tous cas, non gagnée, la richesse a complètement corrompu notre gouvernement et notre conscience. 1020505073En conséquence, la Russie s’est voit elle-même comme une version allégée de l’URSS et a sérieusement entamée la restauration de vieux ‘ordre’ dans sa taïga, dans lequel elle a l’intention d’inclure toutes les anciennes républiques soviétiques. Une nouvelle ‘doctrine Brejnev’ est sorti des profondeurs de l’inconscient des autorités. Une nouvelle ‘Guerre Froide’ est devenu inévitable. Dans cette nouvelle ‘Guerre Froide’ la Russie ne peut ni atteindre la victoire, ni subir une défaite totale: Ce n’est pas en vain que le Dieu lui a envoyé l’arsenal nucléaire.

Traduction: A. Isakovic

Source